Photography Art Books - Letter W  

Walden
Author: S.B. Walker
Publisher: Kehrer Verlag
Year: 2017 - Pages: 124
What has become of the fabled Walden Pond? In his debut title, S. B. Walker surveys the symbolically charged landscape of literary giant Henry David Thoreau. Deeply rooted in the American collective consciousness, it is a mythical place perceived as wild and often considered to be the birthplace of the modern environmental movement. Contemporary Walden, however, is perhaps best characterized as a glorified suburban park, nestled amongst the sprawl of metropolitan Boston. As our awareness of the place is borne out of Thoreau's description some 150 years ago, the current state of affairs portrayed in Walker's images reveals a thought-provoking paradox.
 
Jeff Wall
Artist: Jeff Wall
Author: James Rondeau, Peter Galassi
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2007 - Pages: 168
Over the past three decades, Vancouver artist Jeff Wall's large color transparencies have won international acclaim. Wall has created a unique, seductive and complex pictorial universe by drawing upon philosophy, literature, nineteenth-century painting, Neo-Realist cinema and the traditions of both Conceptual art and documentary photography. Organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Wall's 2007 American traveling retrospective will include all of the artist's major works to date. In addition to color plates and illuminating details, the exhibition catalogue includes an essay by Peter Galassi that explores the full range of Wall's artistic and intellectual interests and offers fresh perspectives on one of the most adventurous creative achievements of our time. The essay is followed by an interview with the artist by James Rondeau, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago, where the exhibition will be on view during the Summer of 2007.
 
From Darkroom to Daylight
Author: Harvey Wang
Publisher: Daylight
Year: 2015 - Pages: 180
From Darkroom to Daylight explores how the dramatic change from film to digital has affected photographers and their work. Harvey Wang interviewed and photographed more than 40 important photographers and prominent figures in the field, including Jerome Liebling, George Tice, Elliott Erwitt, David Goldblatt, Sally Mann, Gregory Crewdson, Susan Meiselas and Eugene Richards, as well as innovators Steven Sasson, who built the first digital camera while at Kodak, and Thomas Knoll, who, along with his brother, created Photoshop. This collection of personal narratives and portraits is both a document of this critical moment and a unique history of photography. Much of Wang's work has been about disappearance-of trades, neighborhoods, ways of life-and to live through this transition in his own craft has enabled him to illuminate the state of the art as both an insider and a documentary photographer.
 
Wasif: Belonging
Author: Munem Wasif
Publisher: Editions Clémentine de la Féronnière
Year: 2013 - Pages: 160
Belonging resounds like an echo of Old Dhaka. It looks at the city with a nostalgic viewpoint, steeped in Bangladeshi tradition. Slowly, tenderly, the black and white photographs of Munem Wasif, lay bare entire lives coloured by the years, the hold of ancient customs, as they interact with the ever-changing momentum of daily existence.
 
Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse: Ponte City
Author: Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2014 - Pages: 192
ikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse worked at Ponte City, the iconic Johannesburg apartment building which is Africa's tallest residential skyscraper, for more than six years. They photographed the residents and documented the building-every door, the view from every window, the image on every television screen. This remarkable body of images is presented here in counterpoint with an extensive archive of found material and historical documents. The visual story is integrated with a sustained sequence of essays and documentary texts. In the essays, some of South Africa's leading scholars and writers explore Ponte City's unique place in Johannesburg and in the imagination of its citizens. What emerges is a complex portrait of a place shaped by contending projections, a single, unavoidable building seen as refuge and monstrosity, dreamland and dystopia, a lightning rod for a society's hopes and fears, and always a beacon to navigate by. This long-term project obtained the Discovery Award at Les Rencontres d'Arles in 2011.
 
Watkins: The Stanford Albums
Author: Cantor Arts Center
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Year: 2014 - Pages: 280
Born in upstate New York in 1829, Carleton Watkins ventured west in 1848 to strike it rich. Instead of prospecting for gold, Watkins acquired a talent for photography. Through the 1860s and 1870s, Watkins charted the remote American West, and masterfully captured the vast scale and spirit of the Pacific Northwest. Among his most iconic photographs are the dramatic waterfalls, peaks, and valleys of Yosemite Valley. So moving were these images of the Valley that they were instrumental in convincing the 38th U.S. Congress and President Abraham Lincoln to pass the Yosemite Act of 1864, the first official step toward preserving the region and creating a blueprint for America's National Park System.
 
La Calle
Author: Alex Webb
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2016 - Pages: 180
La Calle brings together more than thirty years of photography from the streets of Mexico by Alex Webb, spanning 1975 to 2007. Whether in black and white or color, Webb’s richly layered and complex compositions touch on multiple genres. As Geoff Dyer writes, "Wherever he goes, Webb always ends up in a Bermuda-shaped triangle where the distinctions between photojournalism, documentary, and art blur and disappear." Webb’s ability to distill gesture, light, and cultural tensions into single, beguiling frames results in evocative images that convey a sense of mystery, irony, and humor.
 
Webb: Memory City
Author: Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb
Publisher: Radius Books
Year: 2014 - Pages: 172
Located in Rochester, New York, Eastman Kodak was one of the world's leading manufacturers of photographic film for 125 years. Following the company's declaration of bankruptcy in 2012, photographers Alex Webb (born 1952) and Rebecca Norris Webb (born 1956) traveled to Rochester to capture images of the city during the twilight of Kodak's existence. Memory City responds to the uncertain future of Kodak film as a medium by presenting a view of Rochester that reflects the city's prosperous past and current troubles. Usually known for his color work, for this project Alex Webb used his final rolls of Kodachrome--a color film now only able to be processed in black and white--to capture Rochester's fading grandeur. He also photographed the city's streets in digital color. Rebecca's photographs consist of color portraits and still-lifes of Rochester's women, both young and old, taken using Portra--one of Kodak's last films. For this publication, the artists have also created a timeline of Rochester's cultural history, tracing the evolution of the complex, once-vibrant city.
 
Naked Hollywood: Weegee in Los Angeles
Author: Richard Meyer
Publisher: Skira Rizzoli
Year: 2011 - Pages: 156
In 1946, the tabloid photographer known as Weegee relocated from New York City to Los Angeles. Abandoning the grisly crime scenes for which he was best known, Weegee trained his camera instead on Hollywood celebrities, starlets, autograph seekers, and shop-window mannequins, sometimes distorted through trick lenses and multiple exposures. “Now I could really photograph the subjects I liked,” said Weegee of his newfound career in Los Angeles, “I was free.”
Following the photographer’s lead, the exhibition and accompanying catalog documents the lurid, irresistible undersides of stardom, fandom, commerce, and self-promotion in mid-century Los Angeles. In addition to presenting approximately 200 photographs, many of which have never before been shown, the book explores Weegee’s related work as an author, filmmaker, and photo-essayist. The photo-book Naked Hollywood, by Weegee and Mel Harris (published in hardcover in 1953 and released as a pulp paperback in 1955), provides the inspiration and departure point for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, exhibition and catalog, the latter of which reproduces the pulp paperback edition in its entirety.
 
Weegee and Naked City
Author: Anthony W. Lee, Richard Meyer
Publisher: University of California Press
Year: 2008 - Pages: 144
Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, and his 1945 photography book, Naked City--with its lurid tabloid-style images of Manhattan crime, crowds, and boisterous nightlife--changed prevailing journalistic practices almost overnight. In this volume, two art historians, Anthony W. Lee and Richard Meyer, bring markedly different outlooks on photography and modernism to their discussions of Weegee and his book. Meyer looks carefully at Weegee's pictures before and after they were collected and assesses how his practice of tabloid photography was inseparable from his own lowbrow appeal. Lee paints the vivid details of a leftist journalism world in 1930s and 1940s New York and shows how this world helped shape the photographer's vision. These essays restore the Naked City photographs to the mass circulation newspapers and magazines for which they were intended, and they trace the strange process by which the most famous of these pictures--suffused with blood, gore, and sensational crime--entered the museum.
 
Wessel: INCIDENTS
Author: Henry Wessel
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2013 - Pages: 64
In 2012 Henry Wessel assembled Incidents, a book of 27 previously unpublished photographs. Decisive and succinct, each incident is laid down with the aesthetic immediacy of a snapshot, recalling Garry Winogrand's quote that "there is nothing as mysterious as a fact clearly described." As Wessel stated in a recent interview: "We can recognize and name what has been described but not what just happened, not what is going on, not what is about to happen. Once you accept the idea that all photographs are fictions, analogies for the things they represent, then you are more receptive to the meaning that is being suggested by that analogy, by that fiction. To be more specific, photographs are about something that would not exist without the photograph."
 
Brett Weston: Master Photographer
Artist: Brett Weston
Author: Brett Weston, Carol Williams
Publisher: Photography West Graphics
Year: 1989 - Pages: 205
Although Brett Weston had a prolific 68-year career of major one-man exhibitions and has been the subject of five books, none ever attempted a chronological overview of his development as an artist. Brett Weston: Master Photographer is a comprehensive examination of Brett Weston s life in photography from 1925 to 1988. It provides an overview of Weston s aesthetic contribution from his first precocious images in Mexico to new photographs completed just before press time. This oversized edition addresses the six decades of Weston s working life through a selection of 15 corresponding photographs each accompanied by an essay authored by a distinguished writer, such as Beaumont Newhall and Van Deren Coke. A final presentation of new images - completed after 1986 - is introduced by Weston himself. This is the most comprehensive overview currently available on the life and photography of Brett Weston.
 
Edward Weston
Author: Edward Weston, Terence Pitts, Manfred Heiting
Publisher: Taschen
Year: 2013 - Pages: 224
The Life and Art of Edward Weston Few photographers have created such a legacy as Edward Weston (1886-1958). After a decade of successfully making photographs with painterly soft-focus techniques, Weston became the key pioneer of the school of precise and sharp presentation, dubbed "Straight Photography." Through the 1920s, '30s, and '40s, Weston was a major force in pushing forward the art of photography. His photographs are monuments of sensual realism, perfectly composed images of stillness that sear with passion and intensity. Whatever the subject, be it a vegetable, landscape, shell, or naked body, Weston's lens captures the essence of its life force, the fundamentals of its form.
 
Edward Weston
Author: Terence Pitts
Publisher: Taschen
Year: 1999 - Pages: 256
From still lifes of vegetables to shells to the human nude, Weston's photographs demonstrate exacting precision and tonal depth. A compact overview of his starkly original work, this book is an introduction to the photographer.
 
Edward Weston: One Hundred Twenty-five Photographs
Author: Edward Weston
Publisher: AMMO Books, LLC
Year: 2012 - Pages: 262
Now releasing at a price affordable for every fan, this lavish hardcover book with cloth cover and foil deboss contains 125 of Weston's well-known images and many lesser-known gems. Additionally, a detailed introduction, along with reproductions of many unseen photographs and ephemera help round out this ultimate tribute to a legendary photographer. Printed on lush and heavy paper stock, "Edward Weston: 125 Photographs" is a necessary addition to any serious art library. Its duotone reproductions are of the highest grade possible, made from newly created digital scans direct from the master images within the vaults of the Edward Weston Archive at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona.
 
Edward Weston: Photographs From the J. Paul Getty Museum
Author: Edward Weston, Brett Abbott
Publisher: J. Paul Getty Museum
Year: 2005 - Pages: 144
A seminal figure in the history of photography, Edward Weston (1886-1958) began his long and colorful career in Southern California. Among the more than fifty prints gleaned from the Getty Museum's important collection of approximately 240 works that span the photographer's career, this book features pictures made in Claremont, Glendale, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, and other locations in California and the U.S. Weston wed machine-age aesthetics with vernacular subjects, pursuing Modernism as a way of seeing. He produced works of art using subject matter as wide-ranging as sea shells, green peppers, sand dunes and nudes, and he set a standard for elegant composition and print technique for generations of photographers to come. Commentaries on each of the featured works, as well as an introduction and chronology, are provided by Brett Abbott, curatorial assistant in the Getty Museum's Department of Photographs. A colloquium discussion on the artist's work includes Abbott's contributions as well as those of six other participants: photographer William Clift; Amy Conger, author of Edward Weston: Photographs from the Collection of the Center for Creative Photography; David Featherstone, a freelance writer and editor; Weston Naef, curator of photographs at the Getty Museum; David Travis, curator of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago; and Jennifer Watts, curator of photographs at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California.
 
Minor White: Manifestations of the Spirit
Author: Minor White
Publisher: J. Paul Getty Museum
Year: 2014 - Pages: 200
Controversial, misunderstood, and sometimes overlooked, Minor White (1908–1976) is one of the great photographers of the twentieth century, whose ideas exerted a powerful influence on a generation of photographers and still resonate today. His photographic career began in 1938 in Portland, Oregon, with assignments for the WPA (Works Progress Administration). After serving in World War II and studying art history at Columbia University, White’s focus shifted toward the metaphorical. He began creating images charged with symbolism and a critical aspect called equivalency, referring to the invisible spiritual energy present in a photograph made visible to the viewer.
 
Ellis Island: Ghosts of Freedom
Author: Stephen Wilkes
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Year: 2006 - Pages: 152
For five years (1998-2003) New York photographer Stephen Wilkes explored the hospital complex that comprised the south side of Ellis Island. Neglected for almost fifty years, the buildings were in a state of extreme disrepair: lead paint peeled from the ceilings and walls, vines and trees grew through the floorboards, detritus and debris littered the hallways. In rooms long-abandoned, Wilkes captured a spirited new vision of this gateway to freedom. Twelve million people passed through Ellis Island. Approximately one percent were turned away for health reasons. Wilkes's powerful images of the underbelly of the island--a purgatory between freedom and captivity--ask us to reflect on the defining experiences of millions. With that rare combination of an eye that sees far beyond the lens with the technical acumen of a master draftsman, Wilkes takes us on an unforgettable journey through our collective past. 77 color photographs.
 
Garry Winogrand (Metropolitan Museum, New York)
Author: Garry Winogrand, Sarah Greenough, Erin O'Toole, Tod Papageorge, Sandra S. Phillips
Publisher: Yale University Press
Year: 2013 - Pages: 448
Widely regarded as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century, Garry Winogrand (1928–1984) did much of his best-known work in Manhattan during the 1960s, becoming an epic chronicler of that tumultuous decade. But Winogrand was also an avid traveler and roamed extensively around the United States, bringing exquisite work out of nearly every region of the country. This landmark retrospective catalogue looks at the full sweep of Winogrand’s exceptional career. Drawing from his enormous output, which at the time of his death included thousands of rolls of undeveloped film and unpublished contact sheets, the book will serve as the most substantial compendium of Winogrand’s work to date. Lavishly illustrated with both iconic images and photographs that have never been seen before now, and featuring essays by leading scholars of American photography, Garry Winogrand presents a vivid portrait of an artist who unflinchingly captured America’s swings between optimism and upheaval in the postwar era.
 
Garry Winogrand: Public Relations
Author: Garry Winogrand, Tod Papageorge, Rachel Whiteread
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2004 - Pages: 112
Public Relations is a distillation of a photographic project begun by Garry Winogrand in 1969 when he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to photograph what he called "the effect of media on events." With his characteristic zeal, passion, spontaneity, and intensity, Winogrand photographed an array of public events including museum openings, press conferences, sports games, demonstrations, award ceremonies, a birthday party, and a moon shot. The photographs depict our emerging dependence on the media as well as how the media changes and sometimes even creates the event itself. First published to accompany a 1977 exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
 
The Man in the Crowd: The Uneasy Streets of Garry Winogrand
Publisher: Fraenkel Gallery
Year: 1999 - Pages: 168
Winogrand belongs to a group of early explorers of that borderland between documentary and art photography, sharing space with Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, and Diane Arbus and building on the work of Walker Evans and Weegee. Yet despite a 1988 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art and a huge influence on a younger generation of art photographers, he remains underappreciated by the general public. Hopefully, this lavish publication, concentrating on his most important body of work, the street scenes, will begin to change that. Winogrand took the workaday street tableau and revealed there an intensity and humanity as clear as in any image in a museum. The majority of the 107 photos capture New York in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and they now serve the purpose of a time capsule. But more than that they evoke a timeless spirit of individual alive in the city. Highly recommended for all photography collections. (Eric Bryant, Library Journal Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. from Libray Journal)
 
She Dances on Jackson
Publisher: Mack
Year: 2013 - Pages: 144
In 2011 Vanessa Winship was the recipient of the Henri Cartier Bresson Award which funds an artist to pursue a new photographic project. For over a year Winship travelled across the United States, from California to Virginia, New Mexico to Montana, in pursuit of the fabled ‘American dream’. she dances on Jackson presents a conversation, a lyrical and lilting interaction between landscape and portrait exploring the vastness of the United States and attempting to understand the link between a territory and its inhabitants. For Winship this relationship is inextricable; places accrue particular meanings according to the people she meets, what she sees, and by what's happening to her personally. Each human encounter, sound and smell adds extra dimensions to her work and the resulting photographs. she dances on Jackson marks a progression. Stylistically similar to her previous work using black and white film and a large format camera, Winship’s portraits remain arresting and unnerving but this body of work reveals her to also be a skilled landscape photographer. For Winship photography is a process of literacy, a path by which she understands life. Her intimate approach enables the reader to glimpse the world as she sees it, if only for a moment.
 
Vanessa Winship: Sweet Nothings
Author: Vanessa Winship, Max Houghton
Publisher: Images en Manoeuvres
Year: 2009 - Pages: 108
Photographer Vanessa Winship lived and worked in the area of Eastern Turkey for almost a decade an explosive region containing the borderlands of Iraq, Iran and Armenia. Struck by enduring images of rural schoolgirls wearing little blue dresses and their delicate status within politically loaded discussions over borders and identity, Winship systematically documented her encounter with them. The result is a fascinating collection of images, each of which tells a simple story while also documenting these girls in their fragility, grace and without any form of posturing.
 
Road to Seeing
Artist: Dan Winters
Publisher: New Riders
Year: 2014 - Pages: 606
In Road to Seeing, Dan shares his journey to becoming a photographer, as well as key moments in his career that have influenced and informed the decisions he has made and the path he has taken. Though this book appeals to the broader photography audience, it speaks primarily to the student of photography—whether enrolled in school or not—and addresses such topics as creating a visual language; the history of photography; the portfolio; street photography; personal projects; his portraiture work; and the need for key characteristics such as perseverance, awareness, curiosity, and reverence.
 
Joel-Peter Witkin: Vanitas
Author: Joel-Peter Witkin, Otto M. Urban
Publisher: Arbor Vitae
Year: 2012 - Pages: 164
Joel-Peter Witkin: Vanitas offers a concise survey of one of the most controversial photographers alive. Since the late 1970s, Witkin's black-and-white portraits and still-lifes of hermaphrodites, body parts, severed heads, mutilations and similar themes have inevitably provided shock fodder to the religious right, while seeming to evoke an easy relationship to ideas of decadence and morbidity. For Witkin, the goal is simple: "I wanted my photographs to be as powerful as the last thing a person sees or remembers before death." Witkin's photographs offer up examples of life's extremities as unblinking confrontations with mortality, whose power derives not merely from their content but from the keen compositional instincts governing that content. Witkin's gift for still life and his use of religious motifs such as crucifixion and sainthood have been nourished by his appreciation of the likes of Francisco Goya, Odilon Redon and Hieronymus Bosch, whose examples he has translated for the concerns of the present. Witkin's photographs have made a colossal impact upon contemporary culture, influencing artists such as the Chapman Brothers and Erwin Olaf, musicians such as Diamanda Galás and Trent Reznor, and the late fashion designer Alexander McQueen, among many others. Vanitas provides a cross-section of the artist's work from the 1970s to the present. In addition to photographs, it includes many lesser-known drawings and paintings, as well as Witkin's most recent, previously unpublished photographs. A bilingual (English/Czech) text by the art historian Otto M. Urban summarizes the development of Witkin's life and work.
 
The Photographs of Marion Post Wolcott
Publisher: The Library of Congress, Giles
Year: 2008 - Pages: 64
This book is part of a completely new photography series, featuring The Library of Congress’ internationally renowned collection of Farm Security Administration (FSA) and Office of War Information (OWI) photographs which provide a unique view of American life during the Great Depression and Second World War. Fields of Vision: The Photographs of Marion Post Wolcott includes an introduction to her life and 50 evocative images selected from her work, offering a glimpse of her inspiring and experimental style that became far more than reportage.
 
Woodman: Francesca Woodman
Publisher: D.A.P. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2011 - Pages: 224
Artists who arrive fully formed at a young age always dazzle, and Francesca Woodman was one of the most gifted and dazzling artist prodigies in recent history. In 1972, the 13-year-old Woodman made a black-and-white photograph of herself sitting at the far end of a sofa in her home in Boulder, Colorado. Her face is obscured by her hair, light radiates from an unseen source behind her out at the viewer through her right hand. This photograph typifies much of what would characterize Woodman's work to come: a semi-obscured female form merging with or flailing against a somewhat bare and often dilapidated interior. In an oeuvre of around 800 photographs made in just nine years, Woodman performed her own body against the textures of wallpaper, door frame, baths and couches, radically extending the Surrealist photography of Man Ray, Hans Bellmer and Claude Cahun and creating a mood and language all her own. In the 30 years since her untimely death, Woodman has gained a following among successive generations of artists and photographers, a testament to her work's undeniable immediacy and enduring appeal Amid a renewed intensification of interest in Francesca Woodman, this volume is published for a major touring exhibition of her photographs and films at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim. Containing many previously unpublished photographs, it is the definitive Francesca Woodman monograph.
 
Manhattan Picture Worlds
Artist: Thomas Wrede
Publisher: Kerber
Year: 2010 - Pages: 120
German photographer Thomas Wrede (born 1963) has been fascinated by the billboards of Manhattan as a photographic motif. Focusing in on details framed by passersby and street life, he thus creates cityscapes that transform the city into a stage set on which the larger-than-life ideals of the advertising industry merge imperceptibly with the realism of the street and the reality of life. As in earlier series of photographs, so in this one Wrede's formal interest is in shifts in the relative size of things and in the generation of different levels of reality. Snapshots of multilayered situations combine to create a classic collage, a real collage that exists only for that split second in which the shutter is depressed and only when glimpsed from the camera's own angle.
 
Strange Paradise
Artist: Thomas Wrede
Publisher: Kerber/Edition Young Art
Year: 2006 - Pages: 120
These four series by the young German photographer--Small Worlds, Wrapped Landscapes, Real Landscapes and Seascapes, use multi-layered images to create new worlds. They draw dynamic relationships between artistic creation in the form of models and documentation of the North Sea, limning the border between ideal and reality, yearning and being.
 
Celestial Realm: The Yellow Mountains of China
Artist: Wang Wusheng
Publisher: Abbeville Press
Year: 2005 - Pages: 239
A lavishly produced volume featuring stunning duotone images of China's fabled Yellow Mountains by the celebrated photographer Wang Wusheng. For more than three decades, Wang Wusheng has been captivated by the beauty of Mount Huangshan, also known as the Yellow Mountains. Located in the southern part of the Anhul province in northern China, Mount Huangshan has often been described as the world's most beautiful and enchanting mountain. Over the centuries this mountain with its seventy-two peaks has been the subject of Chinese landscape painters, whose singular works are so haunting it seems impossible that these mountains exist in nature. Inspired by the legacy of these paintings, Wang Wusheng has sought to portray this scenic wonder. As shown in the collection of ninety photographs in this extraordinary volume, here are mistshrouded, granlte peaks emerging from an ever-changing veil of clouds, sculptural craggy rocks, springs on lifty cliffs, and weathered, oddly-shaped pine trees, depicted in all seasons and at various times of day. Wang Wusheng's images are so exceptional that they look like paintings. Accompanying the photographs are two fascinating essays about the art history and natural history of the Yellow Mountains. Art historian Wu Hung provides an eloquent, comprehensive survey of the region's artistic, literary, and photographic tradition, relating how Wang Wusheng's work is an important part of this notable legacy. In a second essay, Damian Harper presents an authoritative account of the geology, geography, and natural history of this legendary place. In addition, there is an introduction by the Japanese critic Seiko Matsuoka, who contributes an insightful appraisal of Wang Wusheng's work.
 
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