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Showroom

This new showroom is for you: photographers, curators, collectors, and photography lovers. Each month we select the best project from our Call for Entry ''Solo Exhibition''. The winning photographer is featured for a full month in this dedicated gallery space.

Current Solo Exhibition

From October 01, 2021 to October 31, 2021

Anonymous Citizens

Michael Ruggiero

Past Exhibitions

Many years later now that I am 63 years old, I have learned that it was in my early 20's when I had found my voice. It was then that I realized that my point of view had value and that I had something important to say and share with the world. I was capturing poignant scenes in our communities that I felt were significant for how they described the American culture, moments that captured American as well as universal sensibilities. Scenes that captured essential truths about people's hopes and their successes, their challenges and despair, their individuality and their relationships, during their day to day lives in our American communities. Scenes that defined an American way of life for me
I have spent the last fifteen years capturing the lives of shepherds in the historical region of Transylvania in Central Romania. I am interested in the singular shepherd's lives and destinies, both in the plains and in the Carpathians Mountains. The region of Transylvania is known for the scenery of its Carpathian landscape and its rich history. The Western world commonly associates Transylvania with vampires because of the influence of Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula" and the many films the tale inspired. This series focuses on shepherds in this region. When walking in some parts of Transylvania one would often feel that you have travelled back in time. There is hardly any
Since Seeing You Since Seeing You is an observation of the lingering experience of the final week of my mother's life. She rarely let me photograph her, except in those last days when she changed her mind and without any hesitation, gave her permission and blessing. During that time there was a quality of acceptance and ease within and around her. After she passed the nurses seemed in a rush to cover her body and take her away. I wondered why. It seemed so natural that I would want to stay with her for a while. Since that final time, I have taken a lot of photographs in nature; immersed in its aliveness, decay and wild beauty. I feel her spirit in the tilting trees or when there is a light
The Black Stories Project The wet plate collodion tintype process was first invented in the 1850s and became a primary photographic practice in the 1860s and 1870s, documenting much of the Civil War. The tintypes of the Black Stories Project embody the history of photography and the history of racial inequity in the United States and more specifically in the state of Utah. They draw a connection between the history of racism and the dialogue about race today. In a state where the black population is less than two percent and a dominant religious culture presents a unique and complicated narrative of the past and present, we can only address the current issues of systemic inequality while
In the Street: An Expression of FaithA humanist portrayal of New York City's social landscape of religious faith. Candid and without comment or sentimentality, unselfconscious in its theatricality and self-presentation. Displaying ourselves with grace and a sense of timelessness. Our lives, in a matter of seconds, are caught in the act...where the obvious and mundane transition into something more powerful and provocative. Though not from a religious background, I couldn't help but notice how much daily, informal faith-based expression took place in the street outside the strictures and formal confines of organized religion…churches, temples and mosques. Despite the inordinate stress
My series "Losing our minds" was taken at the beginning of the corona crisis 2020: a bizarre, but extremely fascinating period. Man loses his mind because a stormy situation presents itself that is new and challenging for him. Fear tries to overpower him, he freezes, starts to reflect on the world and on the punishment that Mother Nature seems to send us. We have treated our Mother Earth too lightly, demanded too much of her in our egoism. Reflection is necessary. I want this poetic-philosophical reflection to speak through my images in these corona times. In my series "Losing our minds" I consciously show only young people who are looking for themselves, for the meaning o
Slab City sits on the leftover infrastructure of Camp Dunlap, a WWII marine base activated in 1942 as a training camp for action in North Africa. The base also provided training areas for army troops under General Patton, a bombing range for planes from a nearby Marine Air Station, and a staging area for smaller Marine groups. It was deactivated in 1945. When the land was returned to the State, only the concrete slab foundations remained to float on the shifting sands. Slabbers have been shifting with these sand for decades; building, scrapping, repurposing, surviving, dying. They’re a motley crew, as varied as anywhere else. The year-round population is modest. Roughy fifty stay through J
Few photographers have captured (but no, let’s not use that word)—few photographers have communicated the depth and complexity of primate emotions as Berry has. - Collier Brown, Introduction to Primates, published by 21st Editions, 2017 Behind Glass is a series of portraits of primates made in small zoos throughout Europe. Alone, patient and silent, in these monkey houses I establish a more than passing connection with my subjects. I makes portraits that reveal the unique personality of each of these animals; it is clear that they are posing for me and that there exists a human-primate bond. My goal is to motivate people to feel compassion for primates and an obligation to protect them.
Jewish thought suggests that the memory of an action is as primary as the action itself. This is to say that when my hand is wounded, I remember other hands. I trace ache back to other aches - my mother grabbing my wrist pulling me across the intersection, my great-grandmother's fingers numb on the ship headed towards Cuba fleeing the Nazis, Miriam's palms pouring water for the Hebrews in the desert - this is how a Jew understands action. Because no physical space is a given for the Jewish diaspora, time and the rituals that steep into it are centered as a mode of carrying on. The bloodline of a folktale, an object, a ritual, pulses through interpretation and enactment. In this work I explor
An exploration of memory I grew up in a small farming village in Northern Germany. A village that is bound to its history and that stands out through its traditions even today. Long ago, village women met regularly in "Spinneklumps" (Spin Clubs) to spin wool, embroider, and stitch fabrics for their homes. I imagine their conversations as they worked, the beautiful stories that lifted their spirits, as well as the stories of sadness, sorrow and loss. In modern times, village women continued to meet in this tradition, but shared stories over coffee and cake instead of needlework. These close-knit groups of women often stayed together until their death. In this series, my composite images t
Zaido (Dedicated to My Late Father...) Nothing had prepared me for my father's death. He was taken by a blood cancer before the family knew he was seriously ill. After his sudden death, I had a two big accidents and suffered serious injuries to my face and legs. They seemed fatal, but I somehow managed to escape death. The process of recovery was slow and just as me and my family were about to return to our daily lives, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami struck. The whole of Japan was shaken, feeling unimaginable despair. All hope seemed lost in one single moment. As if nightmares appearing one after the other, these new realities bruised my body and soul, leaving me feel
Pyongyang, North Korea. The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) remains one of the most isolated and secretive nations in the world. Since its creation in 1948, the country has been ruled by three generations of the Kim dynasty descending from the country's founder Kim Il-sung, followed by his son, Kim Jong-il, and currently under the control of his grandson, Supreme Leader, Kim Jong-un. It is a self-reliant socialist society based on an extreme interpretation of the cult of personality and devotion to the current and former leaders, fueled by a large dose of propaganda. The festivities honoring the 70th anniversary of the creation of North Korea on September 9, 1948, include