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Mindaugas Gabrenas
Mindaugas Gabrenas
Mindaugas Gabrenas

Mindaugas Gabrenas

Country: Lithuania
Birth: 1977

Mindaugas Gabrenas, born in 1977, Kaunas, is an amateur photographer currently based in New York.
His initial encounter with photography was in late 1990, when his parents gave him a first film camera Zenit. But those days this soviet masterpiece was not so appealing and more resembled a vacuum cleaner rather than a photo camera. Photography was really discovered in 2008, when Mindaugas Gabrenas lived in Spain. It was then when his first digital camera was acquired and great interest in digital photography was raised. After the first personal photo exhibition ‚Fantasma‘ in 2010, Mindaugas Gabrenas has became increasingly interested in film photography. Currently he focuses on 6×6 black&white photography and works with Kiev 88, Pentacon Six, Kodak Duaflex II, Holga and homemade cameras. Landscapes, waterscapes, cityscapes, even melancholic dreamscapes – are the main fields of interest.
Source www.gabrenas.com
 

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Caterina Bernardi
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