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Jordon McGhee
Jordon McGhee
Jordon McGhee

Jordon McGhee

Country: United Kingdom
Birth: 1986

Jordon McGhee (United Kingdom) is an artist who mainly works with photography. By rejecting an objective truth and global cultural narratives, McGhee creates with daily, recognisable elements, an unprecedented situation in which the viewer is confronted with the conditioning of his own perception and his views on his stay in Jeddah.

His practice provides a useful set of allegorical tools for manoeuvring with a pseudo-minimalist approach in the world of photography: these meticulously planned works resound and resonate with images culled from the fantastical realm of imagination. With a subtle minimalistic approach, he creates work in which a fascination with the clarity of content and an uncompromising attitude towards conceptual and minimal art can be found. The work is free spirited yet systematic with a cool and neutral imagery used.

His collection of work from Jeddah urges us to renegotiate photography as being part of a reactive or - at times - documentary medium, commenting on oppressing themes in our contemporary society. With Plato's allegory of the cave in mind, he makes work that deals with the documentation of events and the question of how they can be presented. His work of Jeddah expresses this in detailed portraiture.

His works are an investigation into representations of (seemingly) concrete ages and situations as well as depictions and ideas that can only be realised in photography.
 

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