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Simona Bonanno
Simona Bonanno
Simona Bonanno

Simona Bonanno

Country: Italy
Birth: 1974

Born in 1974, in Messina, Italy to a family involved in the arts. After obtaining the artistic High School degree in 1992 she studied in Paris, at the Atelier Peninghen, ESAG. She received a Bachelor of Arts, in 1999, at the School of Arts in Italy, where she started photographing with film.

Her photographs have been selected for several group exhibitions in Italy, USA, Canada, France, Australia, Argentina, Israel, Turkey and Denmark. In 2013 she had her first solo exhibition at the Galerie Focale, in Nyon, Switzerland.

A print of her piece from The Inner Invisible series has been auctioned at Snap! Toronto 2014. Two other prints are part of the photography collection of the Bibliothèque National de France.

In November 2013 she won the Grand Prix de Découverte, Abstract category. In 2011 she was the overall winner of the Julia Margaret Cameron Award and Amateur Photographer of the Year in United Kingdom. She was also finalist, shortlisted or first place category winner at several other international competitions.

Her photographs have been published in several magazines, such as CNN, Resource Magazine, Amateur Photographer, Fotografia Reflex, National Geographic, Digital Camera Bookazine Black&White vol. 2, and Drome Magazine.

She presently live in Messina. She works between Italy and Paris.
 

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Margaret Bourke-White
United States
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Jennifer Shaw
United States
Jennifer Shaw earned a BFA in photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. Her photographs have been featured in B&W, American Photo, Shots, Light Leaks, The Sun, and Oxford American magazines, online publications including NPR, Fraction Magazine, One One Thousand, Lenscratch, and Brain Pickings, and are included in two recent monographs: Hurricane Story (Chin Music Press, 2011), and Nature/Nurture(North Light Press, 2012). Her work is exhibited widely and held in collections, including the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Shaw is based in New Orleans, Louisiana where she teaches the disappearing art of darkroom photography at the Louise S. McGehee School in addition to chasing after two young sons. Statement: Photography is always an act of discovery for me. It’s about the joy of seeing and the mysterious convergence of light, texture and form as translated onto film. A sense of wonder and a reverence for beauty are motivating factors that lead me to document and interpret the world through the camera’s lens. I attempt to create images that transcend literal description, reaching beyond the physical surface of the subject to resonate with viewers on an emotional level. Most of my work is created using toy cameras. These simple plastic devices lend a whimsical spontaneity to the act of photographing. Although they offer little control in making exposures, their quirks can sometimes result in magic. I print my black and white images in the darkroom on traditional silver paper, then split-tone them to add depth and color. This toning method can be unpredictable, and like every other part of my process, owes a bit to serendipity. The color work is shot on film, then scanned to make archival pigment prints on Hahnemuhle Rag 308 paper.
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