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Sandra Tamos
Sandra Tamos
Sandra Tamos

Sandra Tamos

Country: Lithuania
Birth: 1989

Since my childhood I was attracted to visual arts, painting mostly. I had a dream to become a fashion costume designer when I grow up. When I was 14 things changed. I didn’t lose my passion for painting, but the camera my dad gave me drew me into photography. Since then I started taking self-portraits and gained some photography experience. Later I started reading books about photography and wasn’t taking any pictures for the time being. When I was 18 I bought my first digital camera and started taking pictures of nature. I became addicted to macrophotography, as the camera revealed worlds unseen by a naked eye. When I graduated from school I studied, Technology of photography at Vilnius University of Applied Engineering Sciences, and obtained a Photo Journalist bachelor degree. In photography my most beloved avenues are portrait and dance photography, especially ballet. Ballet for me is something above reality, something spiritual, fantastic. In photos I try to show ballet, the way I see and feel it. I try to create pictures which remind fairy tales or dreams, which look out of this world.


All about Sandra Tamos:

AAP: When did you realize you wanted to be a photographer?
Before graduating, as I remember. It's hard to say what led me to like it. it simply drew me. I never wanted to, but I suppose it was my destiny to become a photographer.

AAP: Where did you study photography?
Vilnius College of Technologies and Design, Lithuania.

AAP:Do you have a mentor?
No

AAP: How long have you been a photographer?
Since my first shot, five years aproximately

AAP: Do you remember your first shot? What was it?
The first digital photo was a dandelion fluff with water drops. However my absolutely first picture was self-portrait, photographed with old russian film camera, when I was 14.

AAP: What or who inspires you?
Little bits of everything, I would have to write a book to metnion everything what inspires me, so I will save your time and will only mention few key sources of inspiration. Life, from germination/birth to blossom and so on. Water, in all forms. Fog, tiny drops on leaves or spider web, rain, ponds, rivers.

AAP: How could you describe your style?
Sensual, mystical, darkly romantic.

AAP: What kind of gear do you use? Camera, lens, digital, film?
I use Pentax K-5 digital camera, and my favorite lenes are SMC Pentax A 50 f/1,7 and Sigma 30 f/1,4.

AAP: Do you spend a lot of time editing your images?
Yes, it takes skill and time to turn diamonds into brilliants, same with photos. But I enjoy the process so I dont mind if it takes time.

AAP: Favorite(s) photographer(s)?
Too many to mention all of them. Lately especially admire Gregory Colbert creation.

AAP: What advice would you give a young photographer?
Learn how to operate the camera perfectly, theres nothing worse than perfect moment slipping away, or when a moment that was felt right for a perfect picture, ends in dissapointment of failing to freeze it in camera, when it simply doesnt look the way it had to and the way it was perceived.

AAP: What mistake should a young photographer avoid?
Loosing faith, should be avoided.
 

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