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Noémie Goudal
Noémie Goudal
Noémie Goudal

Noémie Goudal

Country: France
Birth: 1984

Noémie lives and works between Paris and London. She won the HSBC Award in 2013.

Noémie Goudal has long been drawn to the meeting point of nature and culture, or as she puts it, the organic as “invaded” by the man-made. Goudal also feels a strong attraction to the theatre, and combines the two leanings in the series Les Amants (the Lovers), in which Cascade and Promenade play a part. However, the two works address the issues in different ways: the one is a photograph of a theatrical installation, its school-play hokeyness meant to underline its absurdity; the other is a staging where a photograph plays the main role. On both stages, real nature is relegated to best-supporting actress.
Source Saatchi Gallery
 

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