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Tomas Munita Philippi
Tomas Munita Philippi
Tomas Munita Philippi

Tomas Munita Philippi

Country: Chile
Birth: 1975

Munita travels the world exploring ritual, culture, and crisis, capturing his diverse subject matters with arresting beauty and poignancy. In 2010 Munita won the All Roads National Geographic Award for his work on Lost Harvest-the death of the Loa River. Recent areas of exploration include Kabul, Kandahar and Kashmire and the HIV epidemic.

Tomás is winner of several awards, some of them are:

- 3 World Press Photo awards. 2006 and 2013
- Chris Hondros Fund Award. 2013
- LatinAmerican Photographer of the Year Poyi. 2013
- 2nd price Photographer of the Year Poyi
- Visa D´or Daily News (France) for his coverage of the Syrian conflict. 2012
- All Roads by National Geographic (US), with his work Lost Harvest, Death of Loa River. 2010
- Finalist for Global Vision Award (US), with Lost Harvest, Death of Loa River. 2010
- Henri Nannen Preis in (Germany), with his work Island of Sorrow published by Geo. 2010
- Rodrigo Rojas de Negri, Santiago. Chile. 2007
- Leica Oskar Barnack Award (Germany), with the story Kabul – Leaving the Shadows. 2006
- ICP Young Photographer Infinity Award (US). 2005

He is currently based in his hometown, Santiago, Chile.
 

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