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Chien-Chi Chang
Chien-Chi Chang

Chien-Chi Chang

Country: Taiwan
Birth: 1961

Chien-Chi Chang is a photographer and member of Magnum Photos. Chang was born in Taichung, Taiwan. He received an MS from Indiana University, Bloomington and a B. A. from Soochow University, Taipei. He joined Magnum Photos in 1995 and was elected as a full member in 2001. He lives in Taichung, Taiwan and Graz, Austria.

Chang focuses on the abstract concepts of alienation and connection. The Chain, a collection of portraits made in a mental asylum in Taiwan, was shown at Venice Biennale (2001) and the São Paulo Art Biennial (2002). The nearly life-sized photographs of pairs of patients chained together resonate with Chang's look at the less visible bonds of marriage. At São Paulo Art Biennial he was involved in the Thomann controversy.

Chang has treated marital ties in two books: I do I do I do (2001), a collection of images depicting alienated grooms and brides in Taiwan, and in Double Happiness (2005), a depiction of the business of selling brides in Vietnam. The ties of family and of culture are also the themes of a project begun in 1992. For 21 years, Chang has photographed and videoed the bifurcated lives of Chinese immigrants in New York's Chinatown, along with those of their wives and families back home in Fujian. Still a work in progress, China Town was hung at the National Museum of Singapore in 2008 as part of a mid-career survey and at Venice Biennale (2011) as well as at International Center of Photography, New York (2012). Chang's investigation of the ties that bind one person to another draws on his own divided immigrant experience in the United States.

Source: Wikipedia


Chien-Chi Chang has always been fascinated by the human conditions of alienation and connection. Both are in evidence in his signature work, The Chain, which is a collection of portraits made of inmates in a mental asylum in Taiwan. The subjects are people who have had their bonds to the rest of society – family, community – servered. And yet, as part of their treatment, they are chained to one another, physically linked in pairs throughout their days and only unlocked to sleep. These powerful photographs, nearly life size, have been exhibited at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum (2001), La Biennale di Venezia (2001), and the Bienal de Sao Paolo (2002).

Less visible bonds were the subject of another project: A jaundiced look at the ceremony surrounding the union of two people. When his parents began pressuring him to marry, Chang responded by making pictures at weddings in Taiwan. The images are hardly festive, rather emphasizing alienated grooms and lonely brides. They have been collected in the book, I do I do I do.

This meditation on the nature of the ties that bind a person to others and to society is a natural outgrowth of Chang's own experience of the divided life of an immigrant. The son of working people in central Taiwan, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Soochow University in Taiwan in 1984 and a Master of Science degree at Indiana University in 1990. He then became a staff photographer at The Seattle Times (1991-1993) and The Baltimore Sun (1994-1995).

Over the past decade, he has worked in New York's Chinatown, documenting the lives of immigrants there. These pictures of illegal aliens stranded on an island within an island have appeared in National Geographic magazine, as well as The New Yorker, TIME Magazine and German Geo. The series earned Chang first place in the category "Daily Life Story" from World Press Photo in 1999.

That same year, Chang won a grant from the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund for humanistic photography and was awarded the Visa d'Or in magazine photography in Perpignan. He was named the Missouri/NPPA 1999 Magazine Photographer of the Year.

Source: artasiamerica


Chien-Chi Chang’s photography and films explore the abstract concepts of alienation and connection. His investigation of the ties that bind one person to another draws on his own deeply divided immigrant experience, as he explores the contrasting themes of hope and darkness, restriction and freedom.

Chang’s long term interest in the manifestation of restriction and freedom was explored in his project on North Korean defectors. From 2007 to 2009 , Chang travelled with North Korean defectors to document their incredibly harrowing journey escaping to China. Between 2008-2012, Chang worked on a project called Jet Lag, which explored the globalised disconnect of the “jet-setting” lifestyle, culminating in a book of the same name, published in 2015.

Source: Magnum Photos


 

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United States
1958
Lydia Panas is a visual artist working with photography and video. A first-generation American, she was raised between Greece and the United States. Through a combination of psychoanalysis and feminism, her work looks at identity and what lies below the surface, investigating questions of who we are and what we want to become. Exploring the roles of power and trust on both sides of the camera, she describes what it feels like to be a woman, a human, and the complex range of emotions we have the capacity to feel. All her work is made in the fields, the forests, and the studio of her seventy-acre farm in Pennsylvania. The connection she feels to this land and her family is the foundation of her work. Panas’ work has been exhibited widely in the U.S. and internationally. Her photographs are represented in public and private collections including the The Brooklyn Museum, Bronx Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Palm Springs Art Museum, Allentown Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, and the Sheldon Museum among others. Her work has appeared in many periodicals such as The New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, The Village Voice, French Photo, and Hyperallergic. Panas has degrees from Boston College, School of Visual Arts, and New York University/International Center of Photography. She is the recipient of a Whitney Museum Independent Study Fellowship and a CFEVA Fellowship. She has three monographs, The Mark of Abel (Kehrer Verlag 2012), Falling from Grace (Conveyor Arts 2016) and, Sleeping Beauty (MW Editions 2021). Panas has received many honors including a nomination for Prix Pictet and PDN 30. She won First Place Awards at CENTER, the London Calling Competition, the Conscientious Portfolio Competition, and TPS:16, and was Solo Exhibition Winner at The Print Center, Joyce Elaine Grant Exhibit, and GoggleWorks Center for the Arts among others. She was selected twice for the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize Exhibition, was a repeat top-fifty winner at Critical Mass. She has garnered Honorable Mention, Second Prize, Curator’s Distinction, and Merit Awards at Silver Eye Center, Houston Center for Photography, Korean Cultural Center, Reading Public Museum among others. Grants include ten Pennsylvania Partners in the Arts, a Special Opportunity Stipend from the PCA, a John Anson Kittredge Educational Grant, and a Puffin Foundation Grant. Her photographs have appeared in many publications including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Photo District News, Popular Photography, San Francisco Chronicle, Rain Taxi Review of Books, Flavorpill, WSJ Blog, GEO Wissen, Die Voklskrant, Haaretz, Philadelphia Inquirer, French Photo, The Village Voice among others. Panas has been an Artist in Residence at MASS MOCA, Banff Centre for the Arts, and a Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome. She divides her time between Kutztown, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York.Source: www.lydiapanas.com More About Sleeping Beauty
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