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Habip Koçak
Habip Koçak
Habip Koçak

Habip Koçak

Country: Turkey
Birth: 1969

I was born in 1969 in Tarsus/Turkey. I graduated from Çukurova University, Department of Mathematics. In 1995, I started working as a Research Assistant at Marmara University. After 25 years, I resigned and moved to England. I am currently working as a Senior Researcher at the Oxford Center of Technology and Development.

In photography, I try to produce Documentary Photography, which I think is in the middle of life. Recently, I produced projects named "Obscure", "Kakava - Behind the Scene" and "I Can't Breathe". As of October 2020, my book titled "Unsuzler", which includes street portraits I produced in the previous years has been published.

I am currently a member of RPS (Royal Photographic Society), OPS (Oxford Photographic Society) and IFSAK.
 

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