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Zhang Xiao
Zhang Xiao

Zhang Xiao

Country: China
Birth: 1981

Zhang Xiao, 1981, China, studied Architecture at Yantai University. Between 2005 and 2009 he worked for the Chongqing Morning Post and has since been active as a freelance photographer. His project Coastline focuses, as the title describes, on the Chinese coastline which is 18000 kilometres long. For Xiao the sea is a place of strong emotions and rich imagery. He states that "the sea is the beginning of lives and dreams." The project also clearly shows how China is changing and has been changing in the last 30 years since it began opening up. This change is also visible in his project They. The project documents the Chinese culture while undergoing a societal change. It shows culture and tradition, but also the youth and their newly acquired culture. Amongst his other projects we find a series called Three Gorges. The Three Gorges Dam was completed in 2006 and presents many economic benifits, however, as the images of Zhang show us, it has also led to a vast amount of deconstruction and demolition. Zhang has exhibited his work in China, Japan, Germany, England and France.

Source: 500photographers.blogspot.com

 

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Alice Boughton
United States
1866 | † 1943
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United Kingdom
1969
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R.J. Kern
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