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Paul Crampton
Paul Crampton
Paul Crampton

Paul Crampton

Country: Canada
Birth: 1953

Paul Crampton is an internationally award winning Canadian photographer who tries to capture still life with a wide-angled story. His images are usually objects that are familiar and recognizable but are presented in such a way that makes the viewer want to know more. The name of each shot is as important as the image itself, and because the name is slightly cryptic, it holds the onlooker’s attention a little longer and makes them think "wider". The visual work should capture the interest of the patron for more than seven seconds and hopefully the name will extend that time through to the story behind the picture.

All of the images are created with medium format B&W film and are developed and printed in the personal darkroom of the artist.

Statement:

When I sit down and quietly think about the balance in my life, there is a need to compartmentalize. There are days and weeks that things may skew positively or negatively but the important thing to remember is that you need to take stock of the bigger picture. Decide what makes you happy and focus on tipping the scale in that direction. Black and white photography has always made me happy. I shoot film and develop and print my images, which is an on-purpose choice to pace me through the magic. I sometimes equate this process to being a caring and responsible parent. To see and appreciate the result of your efforts can be very rewarding.

Paul Crampton
 

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