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Clark et  Pougnaud
Clark et  Pougnaud
Clark et  Pougnaud

Clark et Pougnaud

Country: France

Clark and Pougnaud born in 1963 and 1962 respectively were both raised in France. Clark comes from a line of photographers. He started as his father’s asistant before opening his own studio in the 80’s. Pougnaud was strongly influenced by her grandmothers, both painters, and her mother who comes from the theatre world. In the late 90’s they became partners and worked in duo. Clark is taking pictures and Pougnaud is building sets in which the models will take place. Clark’s north american roots and the 5 years period Pougnaud spent in the US, naturally had an effect upon their work. In 2000 they received an award for their first serie of photographs as a tribute to Edward Hopper’s paintings, which was followed by an exhibition at the Maison Europeenne de la Photographie in Paris. In 2006 they received the HSBC ‘s award for photography. They live and work in Paris. They «make» approximately 10 pictures per year. «slow art» is their response to the speed process to which the human being is confronted today. Their pictures are shown in artfairs worldwide by galleries.

Source: www.clarkpougnaud.com

 

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