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Martine Lemarchand
Martine Lemarchand

Martine Lemarchand

Country: France
Birth: 1965

Author of practical guides to adapted physical activity for seniors.

The series is called "A close distant"

During this particular period of confinement, I wanted to bounce back and use this reality as a springboard, a source of inspiration.
The way for me to live this daily life was to challenge myself to take a picture a day. My approach was to observe the objects in my house in a new, poetic way, by getting closer to their essence.
Gradually the central point of my inspiration was my kitchen, using different using different food ingredients (eggs, soy sauce, honey, milk, molasses, turmeric, wine, sparkling water, blue matcha...) and stoneware or glass utensils, to create a world that is very close (3 square meters of my room) and yet far away (abstract, spatial, elsewhere universe).

I also used this free time to answer different contests or calls for projects and since then I aspire to deploy myself in photography.
(Nominations dans la catégorie "abstrait": Fine Art Photography Awards, Siena Awards, Prix Julia Margaret Cameron femmes photographes, Chromatic photo Awards, Visions International Photo Awards)

 

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