Photography Art Books - Letter E  

Michael Eastman: Havana
Author: Michael Eastman
Publisher: Prestel Publishing
Year: 2011 - Pages: 144
Renowned photographer Michael Eastman pays haunting tribute to Havana's faded glory. In his numerous works, internationally acclaimed photographer Michael Eastman often focuses on the facades and interiors of the world's cities, such as Paris, Rome, and New Orleans. In this book he explores the houses and streets of Havana. Nearly one hundred photographs from the past two decades reveal a world where triumphant past and vanquished present collide. Painterly in quality, these richly colored photographs are dramatically lit and exquisitely detailed. Though mostly devoid of people, they manage to capture contemporary Cuban life through suggestion: an empty chair, an ancient car, a decrepit hallway, a forgotten chandelier. The result is as eloquent as a love poem written to a city rich in history, culture, and feeling.
 
At Zenith
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2014 - Pages: 88
In April 1979, a book of fifteen colour photographs by William Eggleston was published in a limited edition of twenty. The photographs were taken from the second chapter of an unpublished larger work entitled Wedgewood Blue. Amidst his publications Chromes (2011), Los Alamos Revisited (2012), and the upcoming Democratic Forest (2014) and Election Eve (2016), all documenting his lifetime work, At Zenith constitutes a calm and experimental intermezzo from Eggleston's familiar loudness and intensity of colours. The photographer pointed his camera at the sky to focus on the clouds rolling by.
 
Election Eve
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2017 - Pages: 184
In 1977 William Eggleston released Election Eve, his first and most elaborate artistís book, containing 100 original prints in two leatherbound volumes, housed in a linen box. It was published by Caldecot Chubb in New York in an edition of only five, and has since become Egglestonís rarest collectible book. This new Steidl edition recreates the full original sequence of photos in a single volume, making it available to the wider public for the first time. Election Eve contains images made in October 1976 during Egglestonís pilgrimage from Memphis to the small town of Plains, Georgia, the home of Jimmy Carter who in November 1976 was elected 39th President of the United States. Eggleston began photographing even before he left Memphis and depicted the surrounding countryside and villages of Sumter Country, before he reached Plains. His photos of lonesome roads, train tracks, cars, gas stations and houses are mostly empty of people and form an intuitive, unsettling portrait of Plains, starkly different from the idealized image of it subsequently promoted by the media. The book includes a preface by Hollywood screenwriter (The Mummy, 1999), director (Gotham, 1988) and author Lloyd Fonvielle.
 
From Black and White to Colour
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2014 - Pages: 192
At the end of the 1950s William Eggleston began to photograph around his home in Memphis using black-and-white 35mm film. Fascinated by the photography of Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eggleston declared at the time: "I couldn't imagine doing anything more than making a perfect fake Cartier-Bresson." Eventually Eggleston developed his own style which later shaped his seminal work in color-an original vision of the American everyday with its icons of banality: supermarkets, diners, service stations, automobiles and ghostly figures lost in space. From Black and White to Color includes some exceptional as-yet-unpublished photographs, and displays the evolution, ruptures and above all the radicalness of Eggleston's work when he began photographing in color at the end of the 1960s. Here we discover similar obsessions and recurrent themes as present in his early black-and-white work including ceilings, food, and scenes of waiting, as well as Eggleston's unconventional croppings-all definitive traits of the photographer who famously proclaimed, "I am at war with the obvious."
 
The Democratic Forest
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2015 - Pages: 1328
After "Chromes" in 2011 and "Los Alamos Revisited" in 2012, Steidl's reassessment of Eggleston's career continues with this new book "The Democratic Forest" and it is yet his most ambitious project. This ten-volume set containing more than 1,000 photographs is drawn from a body of 12,000 pictures made by Eggleston in the 1980s. The price is expensive (more than $500) but it is certainly worth its price if you like the work of this major photographer.
 
William Eggleston
Author: William Eggleston, John Szarkowski
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2002 - Pages: 112
William Eggleston's Guide was the first one-man show of color photographs ever presented at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Museum's first publication of color photography. The reception was divided and passionate. The book and show unabashedly forced the art world to deal with color photography, a medium scarcely taken seriously at the time, and with the vernacular content of a body of photographs that could have been but definitely weren't some average American's Instamatic pictures from the family album. These photographs heralded a new mastery of the use of color as an integral element of photographic composition. Bound in a textured cover inset with a photograph of a tricycle and stamped with yearbook-style gold lettering, the Guide contained 48 images edited down from 375 shot between 1969 and 1971 and displayed a deceptively casual, actually super-refined look at the surrounding world. Here are people, landscapes, and odd little moments in and around Eggleston's hometown of Memphis--an anonymous woman in a loudly patterned dress and cat's eye glasses sitting, left leg slightly raised, on an equally loud outdoor sofa; a coal-fired barbecue shooting up flames, framed by a shiny silver tricycle, the curves of a gleaming black car fender, and someone's torso; a tiny, gray-haired lady in a faded, flowered housecoat, standing expectant, and dwarfed in the huge dark doorway of a mint-green room whose only visible furniture is a shaded lamp on an end table. For this edition of William Eggleston's Guide, The Museum of Modern Art has made new color separations from the original 35 mm slides, producing a facsimile edition in which the color will be freshly responsive to the photographer's intentions.
 
William Eggleston, 2 1/4
Publisher: Twin Palms Publishers
Year: 2008 - Pages: 101
Born and raised in Mississippi and Tennessee, William Eggleston began taking pictures during the 1960s after seeing Henri Cartier-Bresson's The Decisive Moment. In 1966 he changed from black and white to color film, perhaps to make the medium more his own and less that of his esteemed predecessors. John Sarkowski, when he was curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, called Eggleston the "first color photographer," and certainly the world in which we consider a color photograph as art has changed because of Eggleston. From 1966 to 1971, Eggleston would occasionally use a two and one quarter inch format for photographs. These are collected and published here for the first time, adding more classic Eggleston images to photography's color canon.
 
Everglades
Artist: Lisa Elmaleh
Publisher: Zatara Press
Year: 2016
Since 2008, I have been working on a series of photographs in the Everglades. As a native of South Florida, the Everglades is an ecosystem that has shaped my own history. The Everglades is a series of ecosystems that thrive on freshwater flowing south from Lake Okeechobee. Agriculture, urban development, and a complex series of canals have redirected and polluted the fresh water flowing into the Everglades.
 
Star Shots
Publisher: E.P. Dutton
Year: 1978 - Pages: 250
 
Mitch Epstein: New York Arbor
Author: Mitch Epstein
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2013 - Pages: 96
Mitch Epstein's new work is a series of photographs of the idiosyncratic trees that inhabit New York City. These pictures underscore the importance of trees to urban life and their complex relationship to their human counterparts. Rooted in New York's sidewalks, parks, and cemeteries, some trees grow wild, some are contortionists adapting to constrictive surroundings, while others are pruned into prize specimens. As urban development closes in on them, surprisingly, New York's trees continue to thrive. From 2011 to 2012, Epstein explored New York's five boroughs in search of remarkable trees, often returning to photograph the same trees through the changing seasons and light. Many of these trees, Epstein learnt, were planted in one context--a farm or nursery, for instance--and had survived to be part of another, a city street or public garden; and most will likely outlive us to find their habitat continue to change. The cumulative effect of these photographs is to invert people's usual view of their city: trees no longer function as background, but instead dominate the human life and architecture around them.
 
Cuba
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2017 - Pages: 224
In 1964, while on assignment for Newsweek magazine, photojournalist Elliott Erwitt spent a week in Cuba as a guest of Fidel Castro. There, he captured now-iconic photographs of the beloved Cuban president along with the revolutionary leader Che Guevara. Over fifty years later, coinciding with restored diplomatic relations between Cuba and the United States, Erwitt returned to document both its urban and rural landscapes, and -most prominently- the people of this fascinating nation. Presented in a book for the very first time, Erwitt's captivating black-and-white photographs offer an intimate look into this intriguing Caribbean island. From candid glimpses of Fidel Castro to Havana's breathtaking architectural details and scenes of rural life, Cuba reflects an in-depth visual exploration that unveils the heart and soul of the country. Complete with anecdotal recollections penned by Erwitt himself (for example, the time when Che Guevara offered him a box of cigars) and a compelling foreword written by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., this stunning tome isn't a mere chronicling of Cuba's people and places--it's a historical record of a nation in flux as it opens up to the rest of the world.
 
Elliott Erwitt
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2012 - Pages: 144
One of the 20th century's most celebrated image-makers, this collection, in a generously oversized format, focuses on Elliott Erwitt's distinctive photographs of dogs. In a heartfelt and original tribute to man's best friend, this photographic master captures all the diversity of the canine kingdom. We witness Fido's many moods from playful, perky scamp to quiet and constant companion. Ranging from daring little imps to lumbering and gentle beasts, Erwitt's images unveil the quirkiness that makes these creatures so beloved while combining an unerring sense of composition with the magic of the moment.
 
Elliott Erwitt
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2013 - Pages: 448
To select the never-before published color photographs for this vast project, Elliott Erwitt sifted through his ample archive of nearly half a million 35mm slides. Then he began the mammoth task of whittling it down to this epic collection of roughly 450 pages. For most of these images, the color managed to stay miraculously preserved and every evocative detail is as crisp as the date of its creation. Whether world leaders or sassy showgirls, the subjects reflect Erwitt's own wry and eclectic sensibility. To say the juxtapositions are intriguing would be an understatement. From marketplaces to military camps, Vegas to Venice, there's a rich mixture of public pageantry and carefully observed private interactions. English/German/French/Italian/Spanish edition.
 
Elliott Erwitt: Personal Best
Publisher: TeNeues Publishing Company
Year: 2010 - Pages: 448
One of the all-time greats, Elliott Erwitt is a master whose photographs have defined the visual history of the 20th century--and the 21st. Although his work spans decades, continents and diverse subjects, it is always instantly recognizable. Spontaneous and original, Erwitt's visions are imbued with true artistry and no trace of artifice. In this definitive collection, the master shares those works he considers his personal best. As you browse this carefully curated retrospective, you'll feel nostalgia, wonder--and a lasting sense of life's rich potential.
 
Elliott Erwitt: Personal Exposures
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Year: 2012 - Pages: 256
Seeing what few others see, and capturing it for all of us, is the essence of Personal Exposures. For this volume Elliott painstakingly culled the work of a lifetime, rediscovering prints he had not seen in years and creating a unified whole that reflects a consistent, mature vision of photography and humanity. Here are men, women, and children in off-guard moments; old people; little girls hamming it up; and even various dogs, who have their own preoccupations. The pictures reflect a lifetime of humorous, ironic observation and sensitivity to the human condition. 248 duotone photographs.
 
Elliott Erwitt: Regarding Women
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2014 - Pages: 304
Photographic master Elliott Erwitt has created many noteworthy portraits of womankind over the years. In Regarding Women he presents us with an exceptional collection composed (almost) exclusively of black-and-white female portraits. This volume is Erwitt's evocative personal tribute to female strength, intelligence, and beauty. The archival material spans several generations, with many images not previously published or rarely seen before. Conveying respect, admiration, and sometimes awe, these photographs portray all the complex elements that make up the feminine nature, whether formidable and tenacious, or occasionally capricious and coy. Through capturing their many varied facets the photographer shares his insights into how all kinds of women make their way into-- not to mention their mark on--the world. In these pages, readers will find romance and glamour, touches of sensuality, as well as much affection. Of course, there are also those disarming flashes of candid everyday humor that are so quintessentially Erwitt.
 
Pittsburg 1950
Publisher: GOST Books
Year: 2017 - Pages: 136
Includes previously unpublished photographs of Pittsburgh by acclaimed photographer Elliot Erwitt taken between 1949 and 1950. These photographs, capturing the humanity and spirit of the architecture and people of the city of Pittsburgh, were thought lost until the negatives were recently located in the Pittsburgh Photographic Library.
 
Walker Evans
Artist: Walker Evans
Author: Walker Evans, Maria Morris Hambourg, Jeff L. Rosenheim, Douglas Eklund, Mia Fineman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Year: 2004 - Pages: 332
Although his work has received many awards, been enshrined in the best museums, and been exhibited on several continents, Evans's total corpus is only now being fully examined. This important book revises our appreciation of Evans by presenting previously unknown material in an accessible context. Essays by Maria Morris Hambourg, Jeff L. Rosenheim, Doug Eklund, and Mia Fineman offer novel insights into the sources and legacy of Evans's work. The result is a superb exploration of what was achieved by one of our finest, mostly deeply American artists.
 
Walker Evans: American Photographs
Artist: Walker Evans
Author: Walker Evans, Lincoln Kirstein
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2012 - Pages: 208
More than any other artist, Walker Evans invented the images of essential America that we have long since accepted as fact, and his work has influenced not only modern photography but also literature, film and visual arts in other mediums. The original edition of American Photographs was a carefully prepared letterpress production, published by The Museum of Modern Art in 1938 to accompany an exhibition of photographs by Evans that captured scenes of America in the early 1930s. As noted on the jacket of the first edition, Evans, "photographing in New England or Louisiana, watching a Cuban political funeral or a Mississippi flood, working cautiously so as to disturb nothing in the normal atmosphere of the average place, can be considered a kind of disembodied, burrowing eye, a conspirator against time and its hammers." This seventy-fifth anniversary edition of American Photographs, made with new reproductions, recreates the original 1938 edition as closely as possible to make the landmark publication available for a new generation.
 
Walker Evans: Lyric Documentary
Artist: Walker Evans
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2006 - Pages: 260
Walker Evans's career spread over 46 fitful and prolific years, yet in a scant two, 1935-1936, he produced the singular body of work that came to define him. During that brief time, while working for the Farm Security Administration (previously the U.S. Resettlement Administration) photographing the consequences of the Great Depression, he refined a hybrid style that combined documentation with sly personal comment. He delighted in traveling incognito as an artless photojournalist, but with the independence to satisfy his own artistic designs. Walker Evans: Lyric Documentary presents these seminal images for the first time as a comprehensive, cohesive body of work, in chronological order. These are prime examples of Evans's alchemy, his seemingly effortless transformation of mundane fact into sweeping lyricism. They not only define his mature style, but also offer a path for artists of future generations. Evans has been called the most important American artist of his century, and the impact of his vision reaches well beyond the province of photography. With texts by John T. Hill, Heinz Liesbrock and Allan Trachtenberg.
 
Walker Evans: The Hungry Eye
Artist: Walker Evans
Author: Walker Evans, Gilles Mora, John T. Hill
Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Year: 2004 - Pages: 368
A concise, reduced-format edition includes the same content as the original 1994 edition and 300 duotone photographs, in a portrait that surveys every significant aspect of his life and work.
 
 
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