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Judi Iranyi
Judi Iranyi
Judi Iranyi

Judi Iranyi

Country: Hungary/United States
Birth: 1943

Judi Iranyi was born in Hungary, as a child emigrated to Venezuela. She has also lived in Trinidad, Barbados, Okinawa and West Germany before moving to San Francisco in 1971. Ms. Iranyi became interested in photography in the sixties. She studied photography and art at City College of San Francisco, San Francisco State University, U.C. Berkeley, and Museum Studies at John F. Kennedy University. However, she worked as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker until her retirement. Since her retirement in 2013, Ms Iranyi has dedicated her time to photography. Her book "Bay Area families" was one of the 10 jury selection choices at Camerawork, San Francisco. She has been published and has been in numerous group shows both in the United States and Europe. She has self-published 2 Monographs "Arg-e-Bam" about the ancient citadel in Iran and "Remembering Michael" a tribute to her son who died of AIDS in 1984.

Statement

For the past 47 years ,I have been seeking simplicity, directness, and purity in my photographs by attempting to capture what I see. Photography for me is an act of distilling reality into my personal vision. A photograph speaks without words; it provides a medium in which to express myself.

Three of my life passions are traveling, literature, and photography. This has allowed me to broaden my view of the world and appreciate different cultures. I hope my photographs resonate with viewers.
 

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1985
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Call for Entries
Solo Exhibition
Be Featured in our Apr 2021 Online Juried Solo Exhibition!