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Giles Clarke
Giles Clarke
Giles Clarke

Giles Clarke

Country: United Kingdom
Birth: 1965

Giles Clarke is a photojournalist with Getty Images Reportage based in New York City.

Giles started his career as a 16mm camera assistant in a daily news production company in Berlin in the mid 1980's. He then trained and worked as a professional black and white photographic printer in London and New York City during the 1990's. He spent over 12 years in the darkroom printing for fashion and advertising clients -including the late Richard Avedon in 1995-96. After a stint in Los Angeles working for UK's Channel 4 and on web-based content for commercial clients, Giles returned to New York in 2008 to pursue still photography.

Now focusing almost entirely on humanitarian and conflict issues, Giles's work has been featured recently by The United Nations (OCHA), American Photography 31 and 32, Amnesty International, CNN, The Guardian, Global Witness, The New Yorker, The New York Times, National Press Photographers Association, Paris Match, PDN, POYi, TIME, Visa Pour l'Image-Perpignan, and Internazionale Magazine et al.

He is the Lucie Foundation's 'Deeper Perspective Award' Photographer of 2017 and the 'Imagely Fund Fellow' of 2018 for his recent work in Yemen.
 

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