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Hemad Nazari
Hemad Nazari
Hemad Nazari

Hemad Nazari

Country: Iran
Birth: 1989

Hemad Nazari studied civil engineering but all he wants to do is take photographs. He considers himself a semi professional photographer and a semi professional civil enginieer too. He was raised in Rasht, Iran.

Artist Statement These people live in mountain in small village with 15 houses, but in winter just 3 of these families (7 people) stay there to protect the sheep and supply the food for them in snow and cold winter. These families can go to near small town to buy their requirements but when snow is to heavy they should be there to feed the sheep and protect them from wolfs and other wild animals. The village is in north of Iran, on the old way of Asalem-Khalkhal road.

 

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