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Wiktor Franko
Wiktor Franko
Wiktor Franko

Wiktor Franko

Country: Poland
Birth: 1983

Wiktor Franko, born in Kielce in 1983. He completed Polish Language Studies at the Swietokrzyska Academy, then got involved in photography and he has ever since been preoccupied with it. He deals with both fine art and commercial photography. His photographs have been published in a number of professional magazines, such as Prism Magazine, Camerapixo, Pokochaj Fotografie, Fabrikon Magazine, Musli Magazine, Confashion and a Chinese Prime Magazine. He exhibited his works at a few collective and individual exhibitions, and his photographs were awarded in a variety of photo contests - he was twice awarded in a prestigious Viva Photo Awards and two local contests Zycie Jest Piekne and Kielce Inaczej (he was a jury member with Pawel Pierscinski in the last two editions of Kielce Inaczej contest). Wiktor Franko was a collaborator of Charaktery magazine, and a number of his images were placed on the cover of that magazine. His photographs can also be found on book covers.

On two occasions, he took photographs of famous people from the world of business, culture and politics, including a portrait photo depicting Malgorzata Tusk, Prime Minister's wife for Philanthropist's Calendar, a publication that is of importance for the region. Wiktor Franco is the author of three posters for The Off Fashion, a European contest for fashion designers that is held in Kielce. Initially, Wiktor's development as a photographer ran parallel to his stay in London, where he shot photos of jazz and rock music stars, including Marillion, King Crimson, Porcupine Tree, Archive, Chic Corea, Jan Garbarek. Currently, Wiktor is engaged in making music albums covers of Polish artists, including Strefa Ciszy, Lebowski.

In his photographs, Wiktor Franko frequently uses literary motifs and allusions (a cycle devoted to Milan Kundera's novels). His works, strongly influenced by surrealism, are often defined as painterly. As he himself says, what is most important for him in photography is the atmosphere, a particular mood and surprise.

Source: Galeria Winda

 

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1950
Myrtie Cope is an Atlanta photographer with a focus on architecture and nature. Ms. Cope completed the Summer Intensive and Advanced Intensive certificate programs at Rocky Mountain School of Photography. She is pleased to have both architectural and nature photos in several private and public collections around Atlanta including the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Airport, Emory University Hospital, Broadstone Yards, and the Huntley on Park Avenue. Ms. Cope was honored to receive the Denis Diderot Scholarship to Chateau Orquevaux Artist Residency in Orquevaux, France, in October 2021 and was accepted to the Atelier AIR artist residency in Dangeau, France for Fall 2023. Ms. Cope's work has been included in numerous group exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Her ongoing project photographing historic theaters in the Southeast - ''Second Act'' -was exhibited at Spalding Nix Fine Art in September-November 2021. Ms. Cope was the Nonprofessional winner of the Nature Category in the 19th Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers, and she recently won Honorable Mentions in both the Nonprofessional - Nature Category and the Architecture Category in the 20th Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers which will be exhibited in Barcelona, Spain. Ms. Cope recently began combining her photography with her sewing skills by embroidering her photographs and creating quilts with cyanotypes on fabric. She is still exploring these techniques and discovering new ways of looking at photography.
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