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Trine Søndergaard
Trine Søndergaard

Trine Søndergaard

Country: Denmark
Birth: 1972

Trine Søndergaard is a Danish visual artist and contemporary photographer. Søndergaard studied drawing and painting in Aalborg and Copenhagen from 1992 to 1994 and attended the photography school Fatamorgana in Copenhagen, Denmark.

In 2000 the artist received the Albert Renger Patzsch Award and has since received numerous grants and fellowships, including a three-year working grant from The Danish Arts Foundation. Søndergaard's work has been featured in many group and solo exhibitions. The artist is represented in major public and private collections in many countries including Spain, the United States, Sweden, Israel, and Denmark. Additionally, Søndergaard has completed public commissions for both museums and cultural institutions.

Source: Wikipedia


Trine Søndergaard is a Danish photo-based artist, born 1972 in Grenaa. She studied drawing and painting in Aalborg and Copenhagen from 1992 to 1994, and later attended Fatamorgana – School of Art Photography in Copenhagen. Her photographic works are marked by a precision and sensibility that co-exist with an investigation of the medium of photography itself, its boundaries and what constitutes an image. Her photography is grounded in an objective and documentary attitude, heightened through both reduction and poetic narratives.

A central theme in Trine Søndergaard’s oeuvre is vision and the gaze. She utilises a circular visual poetics, in which motifs and phrases from earlier works create meaningful connections. This takes place in a spirit of both playfulness and contemplation, in a balance between the spontaneous and the precise, the planned and the accidental. Trine Søndergaard’s work is layered with meaning and quiet emotion, and her work often revolves around existential questions that are equally personal and universal. Søndergaard’s work explores what it means to be human, and while her work is often initiated by a personal angle, it also contains an overall exploration of more general phenomas related to historical, cultural and gender related questions.

In 2000, Trine Søndergaard received the Albert Renger Patzsch Award and has since received numerous grants and fellowships, including the Anne Marie Telmányi’s honorary award for female artists. Søndergaard’s work has been featured in many international group and solo exhibitions, most recently at Dunkers Kulturhus, Gl. Holtegaard and Gothenburg Art Museum. She is represented in major public and private collections all over the world and has completed public commissions for both museums and cultural institutions.

Trine Søndergaard currently lives and works in Copenhagen.

Source: Martin Asbæk Gallery


 

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Morris Engel
United States
1918 | † 2005
Morris Engel (April 8, 1918 - March 5, 2005) was an American photographer, cinematographer and filmmaker best known for making the first American film "independent" of Hollywood studios, Little Fugitive (1953), in collaboration with his wife, photographer Ruth Orkin, and their friend, writer Raymond Abrashkin. Engel was a pioneer in the use of hand-held cameras and nonprofessional actors in his films, cameras that he helped design, and his naturalistic films influenced future prominent independent and French New Wave filmmakers. A lifelong New Yorker, Morris Engel was born in Brooklyn in 1918. After joining the Photo League in 1936, Engel had his first exhibition in 1939, at the New School for Social Research. He worked briefly as a photographer for the Leftist newspaper PM before joining the United States Navy as a combat photographer from 1941 to 1946 in World War II. 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United States
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