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Elio Ruscetta
Elio Ruscetta
Elio Ruscetta

Elio Ruscetta

Country: Italy
Birth: 1985

I am an Italian born and London based commercial and still life photographer.

I like to focus my creativity and interest in any aspect of life, as well as ordinary everyday objects sometimes forgotten and unnoticed. My passion is to create interesting environments and images with a character of their own, images that appear different and unusual.

I enjoy working with the graphic contrast between surrealism and abstraction, I love to design and build sets.My work concentrates on shapes, forms, textures and colours looking for a harmony between materials, lights and composition.
 

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