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Eddy Verloes
Eddy Verloes
Eddy Verloes

Eddy Verloes

Country: Belgium
Birth: 1959

As a visual storyteller, he creates a poetic and mysterious world in his mainly black and white photos that sometimes balance between realism and surrealism. He is always focused on the decisive moment and shoots with his soul, not with his camera. Some of his (street) photos are also spiced with a touch of humor and it's difficult to put him in a box.

Eddy Verloes studied literature, philosophy and arts at the University of Louvain (Belgium) and the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg i.B. (Germany), is a lecturer at the Royal Military Academy and General Manager of Verloes Languages & Training. As a photographer, he studied at CVO Louvain (Belgium). Between 2015 and 2021 he has published 4 photo books ("No time to Verloes", "Cuba libre", "Zeezuchten" and "Losing Our Minds/Buiten zinnen") and has exhibited in several galleries in the USA, the United Kingdom, France, Austria, Greece, Italy, Spain, Germany, The Netherlands and Belgium. He has been selected several times for national and international competitions (LensCulture, CEWE Photo Challenge, Fotonale Brugge). In 2020 he has already received more than 30 awards/ prizes including the jury prize of the 11th Photography Contest in France (Toulouse), he was the Belgian Winner of the EISA Maestro Photo Contest 2020, finalist at the PassePartout Photography Prize (Italy), Vienna International Photo Awards 2020, New York Center for Photographic Art, selected for PhotoPlace Gallery (Vermont), winner at the Open Call 2020 ("Fine Art") Lucie Foundation Los Angeles, Winner at the Antwerp International Photography Festival, selected as one of the 25 Winners at the All-About-Photo Contest B&W, selected as one of the best contemporary photographers worldwide by the American site All-About-Photo, accepted into A Smith Gallery's "light" exhibition (Texas), selected for the Atlanta Photography Group in the Tula Art Center, Winner at the 3. Fotowettbewerb des Museums Synagoge Gröbzig (Germany), Winner of the Life Framer Photo Contest 2020 ("Civilization") and selected for the Life Framer Collection, selected at the Duncan Miller Gallery (California), Travel Photographer of the Year 2020 (People of the World).
 

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Kaat Stieber is a fine art photographer who weaves the worlds of surrealism and noble Dutch art into her images. Born on a Dutch island, but shaped by her many years abroad and views on the world, Kaat is moved by diverse sceneries. From architecture in ancient cities to fields closer to home, the visuals are stored in her imagination. Capturing instants of nature and structure for later recall. The goal? Crafting her own, new world. Mixing a broad set of creative skills with an internationally acclaimed background in theatre and costume design, Kaat's photos are assembled with vast craftmanship. Kaat Stieber's main mission within the art industry, is to create painterly pictures. Working from her imagination, she combines crafts such as photography, costume making, concepting ideas, directing and over twenty years of experience in theatre into one rich final product. Always building and replaying stories in mind, always clutching a camera to capture specific scenes. Her works of art resemble tableaus from the Dutch Golden Age, clearly depicting pride in Dutch roots and an identification with classic Dutch culture. An admiration of surrealists adds to the scene. Kaat Stieber, crafting from the brain of a dreamer, mostly works with children for her portraits. The children in her images are seen as wholesome humans, each one strongly portraying a certain character. Kaat Stieber is clear in the direction of her pictures - she follows her own, distinctive path and doesn't compromise. The life experiences that lead her to creating her own painterly realms come with a patience in building exactly what is necessary for a photo. Even if that means one picture takes two months to create.
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Germany
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United States
1961
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Martin Munkácsi
Hungary
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Martin Munkácsi (born Mermelstein Márton; Kolozsvár, Hungary, May 18, 1896; died July 13, 1963, New York, NY) was a Hungarian photographer who worked in Germany (1928–34) and the United States, where he was based in New York City.Munkácsi was a newspaper writer and photographer in Hungary, specializing in sports. At the time, sports action photography could only be done in bright light outdoors. Munkácsi's innovation was to make sports photographs as meticulously composed action photographs, which required both artistic and technical skill. Munkácsi's legendary big break was to happen upon a fatal brawl, which he photographed. Those photos affected the outcome of the trial of the accused killer, and gave Munkácsi considerable notoriety. That notoriety helped him get a job in Berlin in 1928, for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, where his first published photo was a race car splashing its way through a puddle. He also worked for the fashion magazine Die Dame. More than just sports and fashion, he photographed Berliners, rich and poor, in all their activities. He traveled to Turkey, Sicily, Egypt, London, New York, and famously Liberia, for photo spreads in the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung. The speed of the modern age and the excitement of new photographic viewpoints enthralled him, especially flying. There are aerial photographs; there are air-to-air photographs of a flying school for women; there are photographs from a Zeppelin, including the ones on his trip to Brazil, where he crosses over a boat whose passengers wave to the airship above. On March 21, 1933, he photographed the fateful Day of Potsdam, when the aged President Paul von Hindenburg handed Germany over to Adolf Hitler. On assignment for the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, he photographed Hitler's inner circle, although he was a Jewish foreigner. In 1934, the Nazis nationalized the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, fired its Jewish editor-in-chief, Kurt Korff, and replaced its innovative photography with pictures of German troops. Munkácsi left for New York, where he signed on, for a substantial $100,000, with Harper's Bazaar, a top fashion magazine. In a change from usual practice, he often left the studio to shoot outdoors, on the beach, on farms and fields, at an airport. He produced one of the first articles in a popular magazine to be illustrated with nude photographs. His portraits include Katharine Hepburn, Leslie Howard, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Jane Russell, Louis Armstrong, and the definitive dance photograph of Fred Astaire. Munkácsi died in poverty and controversy. Several universities and museums declined to accept his archives, and they were scattered around the world. Berlin's Ullstein Archives and Hamburg's F. C. Gundlach collection are home to two of the largest collections of Munkácsi's work.(Source: en.wikipedia.org)
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