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Kosuke Kitajima
Kosuke Kitajima
Kosuke Kitajima

Kosuke Kitajima

Country: Japan
Birth: 1987

Born in 1987, lives in Hamamatsu City.
Studied design at Hikomizu's Jewelry College, but learned the fun of taking photos with a camera that I got while studying.
After graduating from school, I returned home to become a photographer.
Club event shooting in Hamamatsu City as K & K Photography.
In 2016, I got acquainted with a photograph of Mt. Fuji and noticed its charm.
​Currently, he continues to take pictures with the theme of "beautiful Japan to the world".

Statement
I'm filming Mt. Fuji, landscapes, animals and culture in Japan under the theme of ''beautiful Japan to the world '.
 

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