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Eugenio Recuenco
Eugenio Recuenco
Eugenio Recuenco

Eugenio Recuenco

Country: Spain
Birth: 1968

Eugenio Recuenco was born in Madrid in May of 1968, in the middle of student protests that had spread out from Paris. As he himself would say: " I heard all that to-do, and was in a rush to be born and see what was going on."

He studied fine art, graduating with a degree in painting from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Without a space in which to create his large-scale paintings, he began to collaborate with fashion magazines - first in Spain and later in Paris, where he habitually spent long periods - while waiting to be able to devote himself to painting. Vogue Espana, Madame Figaro, Wad, Vogue UK, Spoon, Planet, Vanity Fair, Stern, Kult, Twill, GQ, and Zink are some of the magazines he's worked with.

It was in Paris that he produced his first advertising piece for Boucheron. From that moment, many brands would begin to call him to create their images, including Nina Ricci, Diesel, Shanghai Tang, Yves Saint Laurent, Sony Playstation, Custo, Le Bon Marché, BSI Lugano and Pernod Ricard.

In 2007 he was invited to create the Lavazza Calendar and from the US he was called to conceive, together withe Eric Dover, the set design and staging the opera, Les Huguenots, at the Richard B. Fisher Center in New York City.

Paris became the city that established his rhythm. It is there where he also created his first advertising spot. This time it was for "Nina" by Nina Ricci. This newly-opened avenue quickly lead to opportunities with other brands such as Loewe, Freixenet, Mango, Codormiú,Chivas Regal, Regione Campania, Vanderbilt, and Motorola among others.

In 2008 his video, Essence of a Seduction, won the award for best advertisement of the year in Spain and the award for best short film at the Mexico City International Film Week. From that moment, he continued to create short films and video clips, such as Rammstein's Mein Herz Brennt, for example. He is now preparing his first full length film.

Although his photographs had already been shown at the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid, the BAC (Barcelona Arte Contemporáneo), the Naardeen Photo Festival, the FEM (Festival Edición Madrid), Les Rencontres d'Arles, PhotoEspana, Art Toronto, and the Spanish National Library, it was once again in Paris where he would have his first solo exhibit, "Dream and Storm" at the Bertin-Toublanc Gallery.

In 2004 he was given the ABC National Photography Award, in 2009 he won Gold and Bronze Awards at the Sol Festival, and in 2006 and 2013 his photographs won Gold Lions at the Cannes Lions Festival.

In 2013 teNeues approached him to create his first solo book, Revue, whose launch will coincide with an exhibit at Camera Work Contemporary in Berlin.

Eugenio Recuendo currently lives behind a camera.


All about Eugenio Recuendo:

AAP:Do you have a mentor or role model?
To be honest I only have my intuition.

AAP: How long have you been a photographer?
I think since I was born. Another question is from what moment afterwards and I began taking pictures. Light and its effects have a great influence on me; I was always conscious of what was happening around me. I think that’s the first need a photographer must have.

AAP: Do you remember your first shot? What was it?
They were some household pictures that I took after my dad finally let me borrow his camera. It was during a school-trip. Those pictures were horrible; and, however they were really symbolic and full of emotions. That’s what magic is all about.

AAP: What or who inspires you?
Life inspires me.

AAP: How would you describe your style?
I have no clue. I don’t frown upon a specific style; I just go along doing what I feel is best. I don’t tell myself that things have to be a certain determined way. I start building and end up doing it in a certain way. But it’s all about circumstances, your vibes and needs and priorities when it comes down to transmitting them that end up paving a style for each series.

AAP: Do you have favorite pictures or series?
I’ve hated all of them at one point or another for not being loyal to what I expected them to be like; and all of them are favorites because there is something from me in all.

AAP: What kind of gear do you use? Camera, lens, digital, film?
It depends on each cases. Now more digital, Canon and with Hasselblad; always old ones and which treat the image with honesty. That is why I like old ones, ones that have a less forced definition.

AAP: Do you spend a lot of time editing your images? For what purpose?
It depends. It's all in the take. After that it's all a question of taking out defects and over all working on the texture and what it looks like in the end.

AAP: Favorite(s) photographer(s)?
A lot of them. For example I love Paolo Ventura.

AAP: What advice would you give a young photographer?
Shoot and shoot. Above all to shoot what you feel; not what is in fashion.

AAP: What mistake should a young photographer avoid?
Trying to go too fast and do what is currently succesful. Because when doing that, success will be in another type of photography.

AAP: An idea, a sentence, a project you would like to share?
(W)Hole time. A project I would like to take to movie-making.

AAP: What are your projects?
A book with 365 pictures, it is a poetry about the world we live in and the full-length film that I mentioned before.

AAP: Your best memory as a photographer?
When I stumble upon a photograph I didn't mean to do.

AAP: Your worst souvenir as a photographer?
Deal with creative managers who don't have a clear concept of their idea. It happens quite often.

AAP:If you were someone else who would it be?
I don't know. You can be creative in any activity that humans do.

AAP: Your favorite photo book?
I have a huge library because I actually love photo books as an object as a whole; regardless of its content.
 

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