All about photo: photo contests, photography exhibitions, galleries, schools, books and venues.

Famous Photographers / U

Shoji Ueda
Japan
1913 | † 2000
Shoji Ueda was a photographer of Tottori, Japan, who combined surrealist compositional elements with realistic depiction. Most of the work for which Ueda is widely known was photographed within a strip of about 350 km running from Igumi (on the border of Tottori and Hyogo) to Hagi (Yamaguchi). Ueda was born on 27 March 1913 in Sakai (now Sakaiminato), Tottori. His father was a manufacturer and seller of geta; Shoji was the only child who survived infancy. The boy received a camera from his father in 1930 and quickly became very involved in photography, submitting his photographs to magazines; his photograph Child on the Beach, Hama no kodomo) appeared in the December issue of Camera. In 1930 Ueda formed the photographic group Chugoku Shashinka Shudan with Ryosuke Ishizu, Kunio Masaoka, and Akira Nomura; from 1932 till 1937 the group exhibited its works four times at Konishiroku Hall in Nihonbashi, Tokyo. Ueda studied at the Oriental School of Photography in Tokyo in 1932 and returned to Sakai, opening a studio, Ueda Shashinjo, when only nineteen. Ueda married in 1935, and his wife helped him to run his photographic studio. His marriage was a happy one; his wife and their three children are recurring models in his works. Ueda was active as an amateur as well as a professional photographer, participating in various groups. In 1941 Ueda gave up photography, not wanting to become a military photographer. (Toward the end of the war, he was forced to photograph the result of a fire.) He resumed shortly after the war, and in 1947 he joined the Tokyo-based group Ginryusha. Ueda found the sand dunes of Tottori excellent backdrops for single and group portraits, typically in square format and until relatively late all in black and white. In 1949, inspired by Kineo Kuwabara, then the editor of Camera, Ueda photographed the dunes with Ken Domon and Yoichi Midorikawa. Some of these have Domon as a model, far from his gruff image. The photographs were first published in the September and October 1949 issues of Camera and have been frequently anthologized. Ueda started photographing nudes on the dunes in 1951, and from 1970 he used them as the backdrop for fashion photography. The postwar concentration on realism led by Domon, followed by the rejection of realism led by Shomei Tomatsu, sidelined Ueda's cool vision. Ueda participated in "Japanese Photography" at the New York Museum of Modern Art in 1960 and had solo exhibitions in Japan, but had to wait till a 1974 retrospective held in the Nikon Salon in Tokyo and Osaka before his return to popularity. Ueda remained based in Tottori, opening a studio and camera shop in Yonago in 1965, and in 1972 moving to a new three-storey building in Yonago. The building served as a base for local photographic life. From 1975 until 1994, Ueda was a professor at Kyushu Sangyo University. Critical and popular recognition came from the mid seventies. A succession of book-length collections of new and old appeared. Ueda weathered the death in 1983 of his wife, and continued working well into the 1990s. He died of a heart attack on 4 July 2000. The Shoji Ueda Museum of Photography (Ueda Shoji Shashin Bijutsukan), devoted to his works, opened in Kishimoto (now Hoki, near Yonago) Tottori Prefecture in 1995. Source: Wikipedia
Jerry Uelsmann
United States
1934
Jerry N. Uelsmann (born June 11, 1934) is an American photographer, and was the forerunner of photomontage in the 20th century in America. Uelsmann was born in Detroit, Michigan. While attending public schools, at the age of fourteen, there sparked an interest in photography. He believed that through photography he could exist outside of himself, to live in a world captured through the lens. Despite poor grades, he managed to land a few jobs, primarily photographs of models. Eventually Uelsmann went on to earn a BA from the Rochester Institute of Technology and M.S. and M.F.A. degrees from Indiana University. Soon after, he began teaching photography at the University of Florida in 1960. In 1967, Uelsmann had his first solo exhibit at The Museum of Modern Art which opened doors for his photography career. Uelsmann is a master printer, producing composite photographs with multiple negatives and extensive darkroom work. He uses up to a dozen enlargers at a time to produce his final images, and has a large archive of negatives that he has shot over the years. The negatives that Uelsmann uses are known to reappear within his work, acting as a focal point in one work, and background as another. Similar in technique to Rejlander, Uelsmann is a champion of the idea that the final image need not be tied to a single negative, but may be composed of many. During the mid-twentieth century, when photography was still being defined, Uelsmann didn't care about the boundaries given by the Photo Secessionists or other realists at the time, he simply wished to share with the viewer the images from his imagination and saw photomontage as the means by which to do so. Unlike Rejlander, though, he does not seek to create narratives, but rather "allegorical surrealist imagery of the unfathomable". Uelsmann is able to subsist on grants and teaching salary, rather than commercial work. Today, with the advent of digital cameras and Photoshop, photographers are able to create a work somewhat resembling Uelsmann's in less than a day, however, at the time Uelsmann was considered to have almost "magical skill" with his completely analog tools. At the time Uelsmann's work first came to popular attention, photos were still widely regarded as unfalsifiable documentary evidence of events. However, Uelsmann, along with Lucas Samaras, was considered an avant garde shatterer of this popular mindset and help to expand the artistic boundaries of photography. Despite his works' affinity with digital techniques, Uelsmann continues to use traditional equipment. “I am sympathetic to the current digital revolution and excited by the visual options created by the computer. However, I feel my creative process remains intrinsically linked to the alchemy of the darkroom.”[3] Today he is retired from teaching and currently lives in Gainesville, Florida with his third wife, Maggie Taylor.[4] Uelsmann has one son, Andrew, who is a graduate student at the University of Florida. But to this day, Uelsmann still produces photos, sometimes creating more than a hundred in a single year. Out of these images, he likes to sit back and select the ten he likes the most, which is not an easy process. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)
Stay up-to-date  with call for entries, deadlines and other news about exhibitions, galleries, publications, & special events.
Advertisement
All About Photo Awards 2022
Visura
Solo Exhibition February 2022

Inspiring Portfolios

Call for Entries
All About Photo Awards 2022
Win $10,000 cash prizes and international exposure

Related Articles

Supreme? Or Sinister? The perfect in photography and its subjects.
It is not hard to admire the idealising designs of Rudolf Koppitz, born 3 January in 1884, but something sinister lurks in his less well known relationship with his wife Anna and the work they did together. What does this history reveal about our current obsession with the digital tools that help us perfect our pictures; are we photographers or painters?
Heinrich Rudolf Zille by James McArdle
Heinrich Rudolf Zille, born 10 January in 1858 in Radenburg near Dresden in Germany, is famous, though unless you live in Berlin, you may not have heard of him. An artist, lithographer, cartoonist and lecturer, his street photography is among early examples but was almost unknown until rediscovered in the 1960s.
Appleby Horse Fair: The Annual Gathering of Gypsies & Travellers in Appleby, England
While living in London from 1989 to 1991, I was thrilled to find out about the Appleby Horse Fair. The Gypsy and Traveller communities in England fascinated me. I knew little about their culture other than they were a unique and historically nomadic people. I hoped that by photographing what was believed to be the largest traditional Gypsy/Traveller event in Europe, I would learn more about their distinct way of life and be able to share it with others.
Street Photography and the New Normal by Betty Manousos
Street Photography in general has changed over the years, we have seen a lot of changes. Recently the most obvious one is the change to daily life from the existing pandemic outbreak. And our ever-changing world, cities, as well as global circumstances are also transforming street photography. I feel every image is a reflection of our era's ever-changing visual culture.
Kirka by Luca Rotondo
At the end of the 20th century, no more than three bears lived in the whole Alps: they were three males that were even too old to reproduce. Since the second half of the nineteenth century the bear has been the victim of a wild hunt aimed at the annihilation of the species from the Alps: under the Austrian government, bounties were imposed on the head of every killed bear.
All About Photo Presents Charles Muir Lovell
All About Photo is pleased to present ' Back When The Good Times Rolled 2009 to 2020' by Charles Muir Lovell. Part of the exclusive online showroom developed by All About Photo, this exhibition is on view for the months of January 2022 and includes twenty photographs from the series 'Back When The Good Times Rolled 2009 to 2020'
All About Photo Presents ’When The Trees Are Gone’ by Diana Cheren Nygren
All About Photo is pleased to present 'When the Trees Are Gone' by Diana Cheren Nguyen. Part of the exclusive online showroom developed by All About Photo, this exhibition is on view for the months of December 2021 and includes eighteen photographs from the series 'When the Trees Are Gone'
The Patina Collection by Wendi Schneider
The Patina Collection is an assemblage of gilded prints in the 'States of Grace' series paired with antique frames - the synthesis of 40 years of collecting turn-of-the-twentieth-century art and objects and creating images inspired by my spiritual connection to graceful organic forms. The serpentine shapes are echoed in the subjects I photograph and the Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts period frames that complement these works.
Portraits From Omo by Ley Breuel
While in Africa, I became fascinated with the tribes living along the Lower Omo River in Ethiopia going there several times with Steve Turner of Origins. Most of the tribes are pastoral, others are nomads moving with the seasons along the river. Some tribes are in danger of extinction.
Call for Entries
All About Photo Awards 2022
Win $10,000 cash prizes and international exposure