All about photo: photo contests, photography exhibitions, galleries, schools, books and venues.

Michael Wolf: Life in Cities

From February 06, 2020 to April 11, 2020
Share
Michael Wolf: Life in Cities
49 Geary Street 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94108
The Robert Koch Gallery is proud to present Michael Wolf: Life in Cities, a survey celebrating Michael Wolf's life and work. For over four decades Wolf examined the layered urban landscape, addressing juxtapositions of public and private space, and anonymity and individuality in relation to history and modern development. Michael Wolf’s work on life in cities was always driven by a profound concern for the people living in these environments and for the consequences of massive urbanization on contemporary civilization. This commitment and engagement remained central throughout his career. The Robert Koch Gallery was the first gallery to represent Michael Wolf, and did so exclusively for many years, presenting Wolf's first exhibition of his breakthrough project Architecture of Density in 2005 and later the first gallery exhibition of Transparent City in 2008. Our gallery is honored to have mounted numerous ground-breaking exhibitions of Michael Wolf's work prior to his untimely passing in 2019.

Born in Munich, Germany in 1954, Michael Wolf grew up in the United State and Canada. He studied at UC Berkeley before earning a degree from the University of Essen in Germany as a student of Otto Steinert. His photographs are in the permanent collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Brooklyn Museum; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Nelson-Atkins Art Museum, Kansas City; Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; The Hague Museum of Photography; Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany; and the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, among others. His work was included in the Hong Kong Pavilion at the 2010 Venice Biennale for Architecture and has been exhibited at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art; Deutsches Architektur Museum, Frankfurt, Germany; Museum der Arbeit, Hamburg, Germany; Bauhaus Museum, Dessau, Germany; Palazzo Reale, Milan, Italy; and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels, among others. In 2010 Wolf was shortlisted for the prestigious Prix Pictet award for his Architecture of Density series, and again in 2016 for his Tokyo Compression series.

Michael Wolf's first major retrospective Michael Wolf - Life in Cities premiered in 2017 at the prestigious Rencontres de la Photographie festival in Arles, then travelled to The Hague Museum of Photography, the Fondazione Stelline in Milan, and the Deichtorhallen Hamburg. The Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop, Germany, opened an exhibition of Wolf's early work from the Bottrop-Ebel 76 series in February of 2019 prior to the artist passing. There are numerous monographs published of Michael Wolf's work.
Our printed edition showcases the winners of AAP Magazine call of entries
All About Photo Magazine
Issue #18
Stay up-to-date  with call for entries, deadlines and other news about exhibitions, galleries, publications, & special events.

Exhibitions Closing Soon

Gallery Artists
New York, NY
From June 03, 2021 to August 07, 2021
Danziger Gallery presents an exhibition of Gallery artists by appointment only.
Gianni Berengo Gardin
Los Angeles, CA
From June 08, 2021 to August 07, 2021
We are excited to announce the first ever West Coast exhibition of Master Italian photographer Gianni Berengo Gardin's work. Gianni Berengo Gardin is an Italian photographer who has worked for Le Figaro and Time Magazine. Considered an artistic heir to Henri Cartier-Bresson, like Bresson he has long used and admired Leica rangefinders. His work has been published in more than 200 photographic books and shown in the most prestigious galleries and museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Now in his 90's, Gardin boasts a personal archive of more than a million pictures.
Paul Fusco: RFK Funeral Train
Los Angeles, CA
From June 08, 2021 to August 07, 2021
This month we are pleased to open the first Los Angeles exhibition of the master set of Paul Fusco's iconic "RFK Funeral Train" photographs. In the years since they were taken these photographs have become an iconic series in photography. While in some ways they represent the end of the dreams of the sixties, at the same time they celebrate the idealism and diversity of America. Hastily arranged, Robert Kennedy's funeral train took place on June 8th - a sweltering early summer day. Paul Fusco, then on staff for LOOK Magazine, was given a place on the train taking RFK's body from New York to Washington, where he was to buried at Arlington next to his brother. Along the tracks hundreds of thousands of mourners came out to pay their final respects and for the eight hours it took for the train to make the usually four-hour journey Fusco never put down his camera except to reload film shooting approximately 2,000 pictures. The resulting images are one of the most powerful and affecting series of photographs ever taken. Shot on Kodachrome film - a film with a particularly vibrant palette favored at the time by photojournalists - Fusco's pictures blend the spontaneous look of snapshots with artistic precision of the decisive moment. Each photograph carries its own weight and tells its own story, but cumulatively the series is an epic vision of America.
John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance
New York, NY
From October 23, 2020 to August 08, 2021
John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance is presented as part of the inaugural UOVO Prize for an emerging Brooklyn artist. John Edmonds is best known for his use of photography and video to create sensitive portraits and still lifes that center Black queer experiences and reimagine art historical precedents. This is the artist's first solo museum exhibition and features new and recent photographic portraits and still lifes of Central and West African sculptures alongside friends and acquaintances from Edmonds's creative community in New York. These works explore the intersections of representation, modernity, and identity in the African diaspora. For this exhibition, Edmonds was invited to engage directly with our Arts of Africa collection, photographing select objects donated to the Museum in 2015 by the estate of the late African American novelist Ralph Ellison. The presentation of the collection objects, along with Edmonds's excerpts from scholarly texts on Baule art, considers the distinct role that individuals and institutions-from collectors to art historians to art museums-play in the bestowal of meaning, authenticity, and value. While Edmonds's work recognizes the persistence of power imbalances, it offers new aesthetic and conceptual possibilities. John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance draws its title from an essay by scholar Krista Thompson that looks at perspectives on Black diaspora art history, and how they have shifted from examining relationships with Africa to questioning forms of representation in Western cultures. Edmonds is the inaugural recipient of the UOVO Prize for an emerging Brooklyn artist. As the awardee, he receives a solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, a commission for a 50x50-foot art installation on the façade of the new UOVO: BROOKLYN art storage and services facility, and a $25,000 unrestricted cash grant. The mural is on view through spring 2021. John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance is curated by Drew Sawyer, Philip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Curator, Photography, Brooklyn Museum, and Ashley James, former Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum (currently Associate Curator, Contemporary Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum).
The Empire State Building
New York, NY
From June 23, 2021 to August 13, 2021
Keith de Lellis Gallery celebrates the 90th anniversary of New York City's magnificent Art Deco skyscraper in its summer exhibition. After demolishing the famous original Waldorf Astoria Hotel on Fifth Avenue in 1929, the Bethlehem Engineering Corporation took on the world's most ambitious building project to date: the construction of the Empire State Building, the first 100+ story building. The Chrysler Building, with 77 stories, briefly held the title of the world's tallest building before being unseated by the Empire State a mere 11 months later. Dwarfing all surrounding buildings, the Empire State stands at 1,454 feet tall. Construction began on March 17th, 1930 and was completed in record time, opening on May 1, 1931. As a tourist attraction, the site found immediate success, collecting a ten-cent fee for a bird's eye view of New York City from telescopes atop the observatory. The record-breaking height was said to serve a special purpose: for its tower to act as a mooring mast for dirigibles, positioning the building and its developers at the cutting edge of air travel in its infancy. In reality, the ambitious docking station plan was not at all practical: “the notion that passengers would be able to descend an airport-style ramp from a moving airship to the tip of the tallest building in the world, even in excellent conditions, beggars belief.” (Christopher Gray, New York Times, Sept. 23, 2010). The gallery exhibition features an impressive image of the dirigible Los Angeles docked at the tip of the Empire State Building (1931), but this scene did not come to pass, and is in fact a composite photograph. The tower would ultimately be used for radio and television broadcasting. A day of note in the building's early history is July 28th, 1945, when an aircraft collided with the 78th floor, resulting in a four-alarm fire and fourteen deaths. The U.S. Army B-25 bomber was en route to Newark, New Jersey when the pilot was disoriented by dense fog conditions. A group of five photographs show a street view of the smoking building, the plane wreckage, and spectator reactions to the crash - the latter captured by infamous street photographer Weegee. A mere two years after its unveiling, the building was featured in its first of many films: King Kong (1933), sealing its position as a cultural monument. In 1964, Andy Warhol set his lens on the structure to create an eight-hour slow motion silent film. Shot facing southeast from the 41st floor of the Time-Life Building, the film simply documents a fixed view of the Empire State from 8:06PM to 2:42AM the night of July 24-25, 1964. Due to its length and experimental nature, the film was met with mixed reviews. As the most photographed building in the world (Cornell University, 2011), there are countless images of the Empire State Building's recognizable façade. Selected exhibition photographs range from aerial surveys to street views, distorted reflections to detailed studies, and news photographs to artistic compositions, capturing the seminal building from every perspective.
Osceola Refetoff: If These Walls Could Talk
Los Angeles, CA
From July 10, 2021 to August 14, 2021
Von Lintel Gallery is excited to present Osceola Refetoff's If These Walls Could Talk in our project room. In a nod to the last year and a half, when most of us spent more time indoors, looking out through windows, dreaming of a different reality, we are proud to present some favorites from Osceola Refetoff's acclaimed Window Series It's a Mess Without You. Captured from within derelict structures in the California desert, these carefully framed vistas are akin to visual short stories. These desert communities came and left, leaving behind remnants and dreams which Refetoff interprets for us with his discerning viewfinder. 'At once dreamlike and hyper-realistic, fragile and formidable, It's a Mess Without You sees crisp blue skies engulf abandoned alfalfa farms. Jagged mountain tops peek through long-decayed window frames as bright orange sunlight pours over remnants of lives left behind. Partially inspired by Edward Hopper, the project finds new meaning in the age of isolation, when the window has been rendered our foremost way of experiencing the world — a shared symbol of a global crisis. Here, the window is employed not only as an architectural subject, but a narrative device to frame the stories of millennia-old lands, and the tenuous marks we inflict upon them in our wake.' by Flossie Skelton for the British Journal of Photography 2020. Refetoff's work is regularly featured on PBS SoCal/KCET's Emmy-winning program Artbound, and in The Guardian, The New York Times, and The New Republic, amongst many others, earning Los Angeles Press Club awards for Best Feature Photo (2019), Best Photo Series (2018, 2019, 2020), and National Photojournalist of the Year (2018). His portfolio It's a Mess Without You is the British Journal of Photography's OpenWalls Arles 2020 Outstanding Series Winner.
 But Still, It Turns Photography from the World
New York, NY
From February 04, 2021 to August 15, 2021
Through photographs, the prism of time is illuminated and breaks to clarity. We see the components and how they fit together. They take us on unexpected paths, they bring us to other lives we could know if life were to turn another way; they foster empathy. They allow us to recognize that life is not a story that flows to a neat finale; it warps and branches, spirals and twists, appearing and disappearing from our awareness. This exhibition presents photography attuned to this consciousness, photography from the world, from life as it is-in all its complicated wonder-in the twenty-first-century United States: from Vanessa Winship's peripatetic vision in she dances on Jackson through Curran Hatleberg's gatherings of humankind in Lost Coast; Richard Choi's meditation on the differences between the flow of life and our memory of it in What Remains; RaMell Ross's images of quotidian life from South County; Gregory Halpern's luminous Californian journey in ZZYZX; Piergiorgio Casotti and Emanuele Brutti's Index G work on the delicate balance between economic theory and lived fact; Kristine Potter's re-examination of the Western myth of manifest destiny in Manifest; or Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa's braiding the power of images with the forces of history in All My Gone Life. This photography is postdocumentary. No editorializing or reductive narrative is imposed. That there is no story is the story. For these artists, all is in play and everything matters-here is a freedom, hard won, sometimes confusing, but nonetheless genuine: a consciousness of life and its song. The world's infinite consanguinity lies here: each of us and all of this exist in the fulsome now.
Tom Uttech: Origin
Davenport, IA
From May 01, 2021 to August 15, 2021
Birds all fly in the same direction while bears and bobcats gaze at us from their home in the woods. Tom Uttech is known for combining real and imagined elements inspired by nature in his captivating artwork. Tom Uttech: Origin will feature Kisibakwad, the beloved painting from the Figge collection, alongside a selection of large-scale photographs by the artist from the collection of the Museum of Wisconsin Art. The exhibition explores the origin of Uttech's work -his relationship with the natural world and specifically with the North Woods, a place he has been fascinated with for decades and describes as "a land of glacial lakes, boreal plants and animals..."
This Is the Day
Bentonville, AR
From April 24, 2021 to August 16, 2021
'This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad.' - Psalm 118:24 NIV Throughout American history, the Black church has been a pillar of the community, a place for worship and organizing, a provider of spiritual and political leadership, and a target for terrorism and bombings. Above all, the Black church has endured, remaining resilient through both victories and losses. This Is the Day brings together 24 artistic representations of Black faith and spirituality, including the work of Bruce Davidson, Faith Ringgold, and Arkansas-based photographer Aaron Turner, that illuminate the resilience of the Black church and the community it has served for more than 300 years. From depictions of joy to quiet moments of prayer to images of departure through funerals and terrorism, this focus exhibition displays the church's significant role in Black history and culture that still endures today.
The 25th Annual PRC Juried Exhibition: EXPOSURE 2021
Worcester, MA
From July 09, 2021 to August 20, 2021
EXPOSURE 2021 celebrates 25 years of the Photographic Resource Center's annual national juried exhibition. The exhibition will be installed at the Mary Cosgrove Dolphin Gallery at Worcester State University (Ghosh Science & Technology Center, 486 Chandler St, Worcester, MA 01602) and will be on-view July 9 - August 20, 2021 with an online reception July 13, 2021, at 7pm. To commemorate 25 years of EXPOSURE, the PRC Curator and Board of Directors will be selecting three of this year's exhibiting photographers to receive the first annual PRC Choice Awards. The $1000 in awards will be announced at the Online Reception on July 13th. RSVP for this free event on the PRC website, prcboston.org/exposure-2021. Beginning with almost 200 submissions, EXPOSURE 2021 juror Kris Graves, artist and editor at Kris Graves Projects, selected 14 photographers: Becky Behar, Diane Bennett, Diana Cheren Nygren, Kristen Joy Emack, Michael Joseph, Tira Khan, Elizabeth Libert, and Cindy Weisbart from Massachusetts, Hannah Altman from Rhode Island, Lee Day from New York, Jo Ann Chaus from New Jersey, Katie Golobic from Iowa, Norman Aragones, and David Gardner from California. There is strong figurative representation in this year's collection of images. Kristen Joy Emack, Katie Golobic, and Elizabeth Libert capture intimate moments of family life showing children comfortable both in their surroundings and in front of the camera. Street photography is represented with work by Norman Aragones, and Diane Bennett who provide glimpses of the action and reactions surrounding the main event. Hannah Altman, Becky Behar, and Jo Ann Chaus tell cryptic stories through their cinematic compositions. Contributing documentary work to the exhibition are Cindy Weisbart and Tira Kahn, capturing people immersed in their element, Michael Joseph's stark and direct portraits from Commercial Street, and David Gardner's visual investigations of environmental demise in the American West. Rounding out the strong group are images employing digital technology in their creation, from Lee Day who captures movement with an iPhone, to Diana Cheren Nygren creating digital collages to bring a family's past together with their present.
Cig Harvey: Blue Violet
New York, NY
From May 06, 2021 to August 20, 2021
Robert Mann Gallery is pleased to announce Cig Harvey: Blue Violet, the artist's third solo exhibition at the gallery. Harvey's work is rich with the emotion and awe she is able to elicit through her depictions of the natural world and the magic within it. Her photographs, abundant with color, implied texture, and even scent, explore the five senses, bringing the viewer to the brink of saturation. This collection of photographs is both emotional and celebratory, filled with intense color, light and shadows. The series, infused with flowers, speaks to the procession of seasons and transitional times. In the image, Scout & The Disco Ball, Harvey plays with dramatic, yet somehow gentle, atmospheric light. The lights from the disco ball appear to dance against the rustic wood walls. Poppies (floating) plays with the delicate line between life and decay. The viewer witnesses the vibrancy of the red and white poppies floating in the river, but is extremely aware of their fragility. This exhibition opens in conjunction with the release of Harvey's highly anticipated new monograph, Blue Violet. Blue Violet is part art book, part botanical guide, part historical encyclopedia, and part poetry collection all coming together in one rich volume. The artist will be present to sign books on May 6th, please contact the gallery to schedule your visit. Cig Harvey's work is included in permanent collections of major institutions including, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; the International Museum of Photography and Film at the George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine. Harvey was named one of the 2021 recipients of the Farnsworth's Maine in America Award and was named the 2018 Prix Virginia Laureate, an international photography award based out of Paris, among many other honors. Harvey has published three previous sold out monographs (Schilt Publishing) the first of which: You Look At Me Like An Emergency (Schilt Publishing, 2012), was accompanied by a solo museum show at the Stenersen Museum in Oslo, Norway in Spring 2012. The artist lives and works in rural Maine.
An-My Le: Do-mi-no
New York, NY
From June 24, 2021 to August 20, 2021
Marian Goodman Gallery is pleased to present đô-mi-nô, a solo exhibition by An-My Lê, featuring selected works from her photographic series 29 Palms (2003-2004) and Viêt Nam (1994-1998), as well as a new collection of objects. Lê's exhibition, her first in our New York space, recontextualizes two of her earlier series with the new presentation đô-mi-nô, 2021, and runs concurrently with the Robert Smithson show, Abstract Cartography. While Lê and Smithson are set apart by two decades, the works in these exhibitions respectively examine similar themes, including notions of landscape, historical legacies of the 1960s, and the infrastructural shifts of that period. The title of the exhibition, đô-mi-nô, alludes to the Cold War-era geopolitical concept of "domino theory." Đô-mi-nô is the translation from French to a Vietnamese that is the modern national version that was romanized by European Jesuit priests in the 1600s. For over twenty-five years, the Vietnamese American photographer An-My Lê has been steadily redefining the tradition of documentary photography. Working in distinct series which often span years, her work has shown her to be one of the most reliable witnesses to the complexities of American life. Her photographs, taken with a large-format film camera, often blur the boundaries between the actual and its representation, embracing performance as a means to explore conflict and war, the military-industrial complex, and national identity through memory and place. Her clear-eyed perception and distanced perspective call into question the status of photographic 'objectivity,' and coax the complexities of various sociopolitical settings and of human behavior. Informed by the histories of 19th and 20th century landscape photography, documentary reportage, and conflict journalism, as well as her own personal history - growing up in Vietnam in the 1960s and settling in the US at the end of the Vietnam War - Lê's work offers a reflection on how reality and myth are portrayed and contested. Her work is informed by both world history and her own distinct path. As she stated in a 2005 interview with Hilton Als, "My attachment to the idea of landscape is a direct extension of a life in exile." Lê returned home to Vietnam in 1994 after then-US president Bill Clinton normalized diplomatic relations. From there, she began the series Viêt Nam (1994-1998). These photographs present agrarian landscapes and scenes of everyday life, often seen from an elevated perspective. Conjuring an interest in scale and architecture, Lê's panoramic views enable us to enter a landscape and to confront layers of history. These works bridge back to sites of Lê's childhood, as well as to those of her mother and grandmother, representing personal memory and culture lost through the schism and realities of war. As Lê says, "My understanding of landscape changed when I went to Vietnam. …Instead of seeking the real I began making photographs that use the real to ground the imaginary." With her 2003-2004 series, 29 Palms, the historical legacies of war suddenly took on new immediacy with the reality of the Iraq War. These black-and-white photographs were made in the California desert, where US Marines trained for battle prior to deployment. Taking up the mode of re-enactment first explored through her series Small Wars, here Lê's photographs depict Marines on domestic soil acting out a theatre of conflict against "enemies" portrayed by fellow Marines. Taken near San Bernardino County, California, the desert landscape of these photographs bears resemblance to Afghanistan and Iraq - where Lê had applied but ultimately not realized her wish to embed as a journalist with the military. In dialogue with the two photographic series on view, a collection of engraved Zippo-style lighters is installed along a corner bookshelf. Lê first began to collect these objects - "jumbo novelty flip top lighters" - at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. The Zippo lighters were significant to the Vietnam War, where they were first brought by American soldiers, and became symbols of protest and emblems of individuality in the midst of the conflict. Hand-etched with personal mantras, the lighters became both 'amulets and talismans of protection' as well as individual symbols of protest and violence. Here, they are swaddled in Lê's hand-stitched 'cozies,' which she wove to quell anxiety in the frenzied lead-up to the US presidential election. The lighters bear idiosyncratic inscriptions, with engravings ranging from "Big Dog 1" to "It Don't Mean No'thin" and "You Can Surf Later" to "Black is beauty Think black Act black Love black We shall over run" and "I am going home. "Witnesses to history, the lighters are remnants of a life in a state of perpetual contingency. Their installation here recalls Lê's memory of the need for preparedness: the shelves reminiscent of the family pantry she had in Vietnam, stocked with American food cans from the black market and jars of rice for emergencies. Lê has written of the series: The Zippo lighters are forever associated with the torching of huts and villages, but they were also a form of social protest for the American soldier. The lighters were engraved in-country by the Vietnamese. It's a thrill to discover the absurd inscriptions with inversions and misspellings. I first wanted to insert my own quotations but realized the vernacular nature of the existing Zippos is more compelling, and still very resonant today. The sleeves/cozies are inspired by the potholders that many of us learned to weave in preschool. They are used to hold something that is too hot to handle, or like a tea cozy, they keep things warm." This exhibition follows the artist's major survey exhibition An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain which opened at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA, is currently on view at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, TX through August 8, 2021, and will be traveling to the Milwaukee Art Museum, WI in September 2021. From June 3 to August 29, 2021, her work will be presented in the group exhibition Toward Common Cause: Art, Social Justice, and the McArthur Fellow Program at 40 at the Smart Museum of Art, Chicago, IL. An-My Lê lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Lê received her BA from Stanford University and a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale University School of Art. She is the Charles Franklin Kellogg and Grace E. Ramsey Kellogg Professor in the Arts at Bard College, New York, where she has taught since 1999. In addition to her survey exhibition traveling in the US, she has had solo exhibitions at the MK Gallery, Milton Keynes (England) and Museum aan de Stoom (Belgium) in 2014; Baltimore Museum of Art in 2013; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art / SFMOMA in 2008; Dia: Beacon in 2006-07; and MoMA PS1 Contemporary Arts Center in 2002. An-My Lê is the recipient of numerous awards and grants: in 2012 she was awarded the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship; in 2010, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award; in 2007, the National Science Foundation, Antarctic Artists and Writers Program Award; in 2004 the John Gutmann Photography Fellowship; and in 1997 the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship
Advertisement
AAP Magazine Travels
Solo Exhibition September
AAP Magazine Travels
Call for Entries
Solo Exhibition September 2021
Win an Onine Solo Exhibition in September 2021

Related Articles

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs
Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) worked as a photojournalist for Look magazine years before he became known as a filmmaker and the director of such classics as Dr. Strangelove (1964), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and A Clockwork Orange (1971).
Paolo Roversi: NUDI
Maison Random is honored to present NUDI, an exhibition of Paolo Roversi´s famous nudes inside the Chapel at Palazzo Baronio in Ravenna. A tribute to the Artist to Beauty and Nature.
The Magnum Square Print Sale: Way for Escape
'Way for Escape' Magnum's Square Print Sale, runs from Monday July 12, 6AM PST to Sunday, July 18, 11:59 PM PST. Signed or estate-stamped, museum-quality, 6x6” prints from over 100 visual artists will exceptionally be available for $100, for 5 days only, from magnumphotos.com/shop.
Rencontres d’Arles de la Photographie 2021
This summer, we will be especially happy to welcome you to Arles for the Rencontres de la photographie. More than ever, we need to get together and celebrate culture. The 51st edition did not take place in 2020, a year without festivals. In 2021, we will offer you the 52nd, a balance between key shows that could not be held last year and exciting new proposals. This is a transitional year between two directors: we welcomed Christoph Wiesner as the new head of the festival in September 2020.
Easton Nights by Peter Ydeen
Easton Nights is the solo show featuring a selection of works of the American photographer Peter Ydeen curated by Camilla Boemio. The images were selected with the aim of showcasing the myriad facets of Ydeen!s nocturnal narrative. Ydeen is well known for depicting urban landscapes whose complexities are described by the beauty of the mundane world.
La Villa by Dominique Tarlé
50 years ago, the biggest rock band in the world, the Rolling Stones, landed in the south of France. Following various tax woes in England, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman and Mick Taylor decided to come and seek shelter in France. The young photographer Dominique Tarlé who had known the band for a few years in London and on tour, came to join his favorite musicians in order to immortalize them in this new environment...
Tommaso Protti Amazonia
The 10th Carmignac Photojournalism Award is dedicated to the Amazon and the issues related to its deforestation. It is chaired by Yolanda Kakabadse, Minister of the Environment of Ecuador between 1998 and 2000 and President of WWF from 2010 to 2017. The Award was awarded to Tommaso Protti.
All About Photo is Pleased to Present Since Seeing You
All About Photo is pleased to present Since Seeing You by Ruth Lauer-Manenti. Part of the exclusive online showroom developed by All About Photo, this exhibition is on view for the entire month of June 2021 and includes twenty photographs from the series Since Seeing You.
Photographic Festival: L’oeil Urbain
L'OEil Urbain Festival explores themes related to new urban realities. This photographic festival - including the ninth edition will be held from May 27 to July 4, 2021 - has become an unmissable event on in France
Call for Entries
AAP Magazine #20: Travels
Publish your work in AAP Magazine and win $1,000 Cash Prizes