Photographer Monographs - Letter S:

Nocturnes
Author: Josephine Sacabo
Publisher: Luna Press
Year: 2012 - Pages: 96
A wonderful book with poetic images of Josephine Sacabo.
Óyeme con los Ojos
Author: Josephine Sacabo
Publisher: Josephine Sacabo
Year: 2011 - Pages: 98
A catalogue of Josephine Sacabo's retrospective exhibition at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Hardbound in embossed linen with sixty-eight images, an introduction by John Stevenson, and notes on the portfolios by Josephine Sacabo. "...To be sure, each component does stand on its own; a distinct, titled, portfolio of images. Each was preceded by a year or more of silence: artist at work. Then, all of a piece, the body of work appears fully formed. There is one characteristic in common: each portfolio crystalizes around a particular poem, or just a wisp of a poem, that somehow became caught up in Sacabo's imagination. The epiphany of the exhibition, this collection of a life's work so far, is that these portfolios are not isolated islands. They are components - cantos - of a single extended work."
Une Femme Habitée
Author: Josephine Sacabo
Publisher: Distributed Art Pub Inc
Year: 1999
Josephine Sacabo studied photography at Bard College in New York. Following the steps of Robert Frank, Joseph Koudelka and Henri Cartier-Bresson in England and France, she settled in New Orleans. This book shows her 1991 work influenced by the poetry of Rilke, Baudelaire, Garcia Lorca and Huidobro. Forty-Five black and white photographs 8.5" x 7.5" on Fine Art high grade paper. Two chapter headings in French. Published in France.
Genesis: Sebastião Salgado
Author: Sebastião Salgado
Publisher: Taschen
Year: 2013 - Pages: 520
Having been raised on a rural farm in Brazil, far from civilization and without television, Salgado possessed a deep love and respect for nature; he was also particularly sensitive to the ways in which human beings are affected by their often devastating socio-economic conditions. Of the myriad works Salgado has produced in his esteemed career, three long-term projects stand out: Workers (1993), documenting the vanishing way of life of manual laborers across the world, Migrations (2000), a tribute to mass migration driven by hunger, natural disasters, environmental degradation and demographic pressure, and this new opus, Genesis, the result of an epic eight-year expedition to rediscover the mountains, deserts and oceans, the animals and peoples that have so far escaped the imprint of modern society—the land and life of a still-pristine planet. “Some 46% of the planet is still as it was in the time of genesis,” Salgado reminds us. “We must preserve what exists.” The Genesis project, along with Salgado’s Instituto Terra, are dedicated to showing the beauty of our planet, reversing the damage done to it, and preserving it for the future.
Other Americas
Author: Sebastião Salgado
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2015 - Pages: 128
Sebastiao Salgado spent seven years photographing and living with the peoples of Brazil, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, Guatemala, and Mexico. His portrait of the daily life there shows us both the cultures and their politics. It is, according to the publisher, "the visual equivalent to the magic of a Gabriel García Márquez tale." One of the most powerful visions of life in Central and South America ever recorded by a photographer.
This book was first published in 1986.
Sahel: The End of the Road
Author: Sebastião Salgado
Publisher: University of California Press
Year: 2004 - Pages: 152
In 1984 Sebastião Salgado began what would be a fifteen-month project of photographing the drought-stricken Sahel region of Africa in the countries of Chad, Ethiopia, Mali, and Sudan, where approximately one million people died from extreme malnutrition and related causes. Working with the humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders, Salgado documented the enormous suffering and the great dignity of the refugees. This early work became a template for his future photographic projects about other afflicted people around the world. Since then, Salgado has again and again sought to give visual voice to those millions of human beings who, because of military conflict, poverty, famine, overpopulation, pestilence, environmental degradation, and other forms of catastrophe, teeter on the edge of survival. Beautifully produced, with thoughtful supporting narratives by Orville Schell, Fred Ritchin, and Eduardo Galeano, this first U.S. edition brings some of Salgado's earliest and most important work to an American audience for the first time. Twenty years after the photographs were taken, Sahel: The End of the Road is still painfully relevant.
Workers - Sebastião Salgado
Author: Sebastião Salgado
Publisher: Aperture Foundation
Year: 2005 - Pages: 400
More than those of any other living photographer, Sebastião Salgado's images of the world's poor stand in tribute to the human condition. His transforming photographs bestow dignity on the most isolated and neglected, from famine-stricken refugees in the Sahel to the indigenous peoples of South America. Workers is a global epic that transcends mere imagery to become an affirmation of the enduring spirit of working women and men. The book is an archaeological exploration of the activities that have defined labor from the Stone Age through the Industrial Age, to the present. Divided into six categories--"Agriculture," "Food," "Mining," "Industry," "Oil" and "Construction"--the book unearths layers of visual information to reveal the ceaseless human activity at the core of modern civilization.
Txema Salvans: The Waiting Game
Author: Txema Salvans
Publisher: RM
Year: 2014 - Pages: 88
Gathering a series of photographs taken by Txema Salvans (born 1971) over the course of six years, The Waiting Game documents the exercise of prostitution along the highways of Spain’s Mediterranean coast. Disguised as a surveyor, Salvans photographed prostitution with an emphasis on the decidedly unerotic quality of its actual environs: the intersections, roundabouts, dead-end streets and shoulders of the road. The photographs in this book present the solitary figure of the waiting woman as a stereotypical image of objectified sexuality, in a landscape that is both striking and tragic. Exploring the varied and often surprising gamut of human longings and behaviors, Salvans achieves a balance of sociological dissection and naturalistic narration, and presents the image of the prostitute as an almost impersonal component of a larger mechanism.
Victoria Sambunaris: Taxonomy of a Landscape
Author: Victoria Sambunaris
Publisher: Radius Books
Year: 2014 - Pages: 196
For more than a decade, Victoria Sambunaris (born 1964) has crossed the United States with her five-by-seven wooden field camera and sheets of color negative film. Traveling seemingly every road nationwide, Sambunaris has described herself as having "an unrelenting curiosity to understand the American landscape and our place in it." This first monograph on Sambunaris' work consists of two handsome hardback volumes. The first includes a retrospective selection of her images from 2000 to 2013; the second documents the artist's collected professional ephemera as a photographer and researcher. Included in this fascinating assortment of documents are images of books on geology and history, maps, artifacts such as mineral specimens, journals and road logs, as well as her small photographic sketches. An essay from MOCP Director Natasha Egan provides an insightful overview of this ardent chronicler of contemporary America.
Here Far Away
Author: Pentti Sammallahti
Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing
Year: 2012 - Pages: 256
This retrospective covers more than forty years of work and unfolds in almost as many countries. Pentti Sammallahti is a wanderer who makes subtle observations of the people and animals he encounters. He records the ordinary and in that ordinariness finds the “wondrous” and “beautiful.” Sammallahti is recognized as a master craftsman both in terms of the photographic print and also in mechanical printing methods—he has been a major influence on published photographic art. He has had an enormous influence on a generation of photographers in Scandinavia and, since 1979, has published thirteen books and portfolios and received innumerable awards.
The Eyes of the City
Author: Richard Sandler
Publisher: powerHouse Books
Year: 2016 - Pages: 180
Timing, skill, and talent all play an important role in creating a great photograph, but the most primary element, the photographer’s eye, is perhaps the most crucial. In The Eyes of the City, Richard Sandler showcases decades’ worth of work, proving his eye for street life rivals any of his generation. From 1977 to just weeks before September 11, 2001, Richard regularly walked through the streets of Boston and New York, making incisive and humorous pictures that read the pulse of that time. After serendipitously being gifted a Leica camera in 1977, Sandler shot in Boston for three productive years and then moved back home to photograph in an edgy, dangerous, colicky New York City.
Acta Est
Artist: Lise Sarfati
Author: Lise Sarfati, Olga Medvedkova
Publisher: Phaidon Press, Incorporated
Year: 2007 - Pages: 104
This is the first book by French photographer-artist Lise Sarfati, composed of images made during extended visits to Russia during the 1990s. The book is neither travelogue nor photojournalistic essay. Rather, Sarfati uses descriptions of the details of the Russian environments which fascinate her to create a visual drama - a personal theatre of dysfunction and deterioration, of change and beauty. The title - literally "it (feminine) is over" from the Latin phrase "Acta Est Fabula" meaning "the play is over" - signals her insistence that the work not be read as journalism but as a work of theatrical imagination.
She
Artist: Lise Sarfati
Author: Lise Sarfati, Quentin Bajac
Publisher: Twin Palms Publishers
Year: 2012 - Pages: 120
A family album preserves only carefully selected photographs. Out of an entire life, it stores only handpicked moments, privileging special occasions, happy ones usually, and consigning the rest to oblivion: happy faces, relaxed moments, places of leisure rather than work. It tends to underline a group’s social links and affective relations, to highlight an identity, a communal spirit, a shared life and destiny. The portrait of the couple or group, with all its attendant conventions, is one of its inescapable figures. The family album tries to register the evolution of a particular human community, to write its story and scan the passage of time with each succeeding page. None of this figures in She: instead of a chronology, time is stopped, it appears to stammer and bite its own tail. There is no group photo or desire to stage a collective destiny, but only isolated models and individuals who do not seem to communicate amongst themselves, or only barely; no happy moments or picturesque places, only indifferent moments in ordinary places; no strong gesture, none of the conventional poses, and no complicity with the photographer. The models pose, but reservedly, more often than not without looking into the camera. And even when we do see their faces, we don’t really seem to see them. They are here, but they are always also there, elsewhere. When we close the book and think a bit about it, we cannot but see She as the anti-family album par excellence. Quentin Bajac Chief Curator of Photography at the Centre Pompidou, Musée Nationale d'art moderne in Paris
The Forbidden Reel
Author: Jonathan Saruk
Publisher: Daylight Books
Year: 2014 - Pages: 124
In a nondescript concrete building on a busy street in the old city of Kabul, young men file into a dark, smoke-filled theater and take their seats. Soon the projector roars to life, and the audience begins to laugh, whistle and even dance as the latest Pakistani cinematic drama illuminates the big screen before them. In his new book, Forbidden Reel, American-born, Sweden-based photographer Jonathan Saruk documents the cinemas of Kabul--entertainment venues that had been banned under the Taliban but which have sputtered back to life since the US invasion 12 years ago. Forbidden Reel provides an alternative narrative to life in this violence-plagued city where going to the movies, for many, is an escape from the harsh reality that lies outside the secure confines of the theater.
Viviane Sassen: In and Out of Fashion
Author: Viviane Sassen, Charlotte Cotton and Nanda Van Den Berg
Publisher: Prestel
Year: 2013 - Pages: 250
Following the success of Parasomnia, this major new book focuses on the fashion photography of Viviane Sassen. Bringing together 17 years of work in the fashion world, this eye-catching volume features selections from Sassen's award winning series and campaigns for Stella McCartney, Adidas, Carven, Bergdorf Goodman, MiuMiu, and M Missoni, along with editorials for magazines such as the New York Times Magazine, i-D, Numéro, Purple, AnOther Magazine, Dazed &Confused, Fantastic Man, and POP. Sassen's intuitive and imaginative style can be flamboyant, contemplative, erotic, and surreal, often simultaneously. This volume includes essays that offer a context for Sassen's work in the history of fashion photography as well as a bibliography of nearly all of her fashion series. The book will be a delight for Sassen's many fans and those eager for inspiration or beautiful escape.
Black and White Fifties: Jurgen Schadeberg
Author: Jurden Schadeberg
Publisher: Protea Boekhuis
Year: 2013 - Pages: 143
During apartheid, Jurgen Schadeberg worked for the leading "black" publications of the time. This way he had access to the likes of a young activists, like the lawyer, named Nelson Mandela. Iconic pictures of many future South African leaders followed.
Ken Schles: Invisible City
Author: Ken Schles
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2015 - Pages: 80
For a decade, Ken Schles watched the passing of time from his Lower East Side neighborhood. His camera fixed the instances of his observations, and these moments became the foundation of his "invisible city." Friends and architecture come under the scrutiny of his lens and, when sorted and viewed in the pages of this book, a remarkable achievement of personal vision emerges. Twenty-five years later, Invisible City still has the ability to transfix the viewer. A penetrating and intimate portrayal of a world few had entrance to--or means of egress from--Invisible City stands alongside Brassai's Paris de Nuit and van der Elsken's Love On The Left Bank as one of the twentieth century's great depictions of nocturnal bohemian experience. Documenting his life in New York City's East Village during its heyday in the tumultuous 1980s, Schles captured its look and attitude in delirious and dark honesty. Long out of print, this "missing link" in the history of the photographic book is now once again made available. Using scans from the original negatives and Steidl's five-plate technique to bring out nuance and detail never seen before, this new edition transcends the original of this underground cult classic.
Close-Up
Author: Martin Schoeller
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2005 - Pages: 112
Almost each week, Martin Schoeller is called upon by The New Yorker magazine to capture portraits of the most recognized personalities of our time (President Bill Clinton, Prince Bandar bin Sultan, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Norman Mailer, Jack Nicholson and many others). Over 100 of these stunning headshot portraits are collected here in a monograph that tracks the evolution of his style and showcases the body of his work. His photographs strip away all extras, leaving only the form and light. Martin Schoeller is a rare photographer who is advancing a new style and vision in the world of portrait photography.
Female Bodybuilders
Author: Martin Schoeller
Publisher: Pond Press
Year: 2008 - Pages: 96
Female Bodybuilders is the second monograph by contemporary artist and photographer Martin Schoeller. Schoeller is considered a contemporary master of portrait photography. Since 1999, Martin Schoeller has been contracted by The New Yorker to capture portraits of the most recognized personalities of our time. Through this and other magazines, he has photographed President Bill Clinton, Barak Obama, Tom Wolfe, Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, and many others.
Identical
Author: Martin Schoeller
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2012 - Pages: 132
Long a source of fascination, twins have often been a theme of myth and legend. The founding of Rome by Romulus and Remus is one of the many instances that spring to mind. Even when separated at birth, twins usually have uncannily similar tastes, habits and life experiences. In this landmark photographic study, Martin Schoeller uses his distinctive close-up portrait style to examine 40 sets of identical twins, capturing every subtle aspect of their facial structure and expressions. We notice the myriad similarities and the seemingly miniscule--yet significant--differences. Browsing this remarkable collection, you'll find yourself pondering how appearance and identity define our sense of our selves.
Martin Schoeller
Author: Martin Schoeller
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2009 - Pages: 96
Martin Schoeller is a master in both staged photographs as well as raw portraits establishing a new paradigm in photography. As typified in the best-selling Close Up (ISBN 978-3-8327-9045-5), Schoeller captures well-known personalities stripped of artifice and PR spin. The resultant headshots are pure and resonant. Yet, this photographic artist is also a master storyteller who juggles elements of fairytales and blockbuster movies. His action-packed vignettes are worlds unto themselves…dark little universes where anything can—and does—happen.
Portraits
Author: Martin Schoeller
Publisher: teNeues
Year: 2014 - Pages: 280
Building on the success of his previous titles, Close Up and Identical, Martin Schoeller's momentous Portraits is cause for celebration. The illustrious photographer's full range of expression is on display in this unprecedented gathering of editorial images. With an impressive amount of variety and scale, Schoeller shares his signature compositional imagination alongside the wry wit that animates his work. Whether portraits of political leaders, Hollywood stars, business entrepreneurs, or contemporary music royalty, these images are as daring as they are exacting, playful and precise. Regardless of the subject and setting, Schoeller's photographs seemingly come to life. While Portraits will surely thrill devoted fans, it will also attract new admirers with images they've noted in top magazines. Every frame in this expansive volume is touched with Schoeller's distinctive flare for creative meticulously realized worlds--and confirm that he's a talent that consistently resets the limits of photographic portraiture.
Robin Schwartz: Amelia and the Animals
Author: Robin Schwartz
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2014 - Pages: 144
Amelia is 14 years old. In many ways, she is your average American teenager: since she was three years old, she has been her mother's muse, and the subject of her photographs. However, not every mom is a world-class photographer with a predilection for photographing animals. And it's not every teenager who has portraits of herself with elephants, llamas, ponies, tigers, kangaroos, chimpanzees and endless dogs, cats, and other animals--portraits that hang in the collections of major art museums around the world. Amelia and the Animals is Robin Schwartz's second monograph featuring this collaborative series dedicated to documenting her and Amelia's adventures among the animals. As Schwartz puts it, "Photography is a means for Amelia to meet animals. Until recently, she took these opportunities for granted. She didn't realize how unusual her encounters were until everyone started to tell her how lucky she was to meet so many animals." Nonetheless, these images are more than documents of Amelia and her rapport with animals; they offer a meditation on the nature of interspecies communication and serve as evidence of a shared mother-daughter journey into invented worlds.
Chim: Children of War
Author: Carole Naggar, David Seymour
Publisher: Umbrage Editions
Year: 2013 - Pages: 144
"Chim picked up his camera the way a doctor takes his stethoscope out of his bag, applying his diagnosis to the condition of the heart. His own was vulnerable."—Henri Cartier-Bresson Among the great masters of European photography, Chim endures as a legend. Along with Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, and George Rodger, he co-founded photojournalism's famous cooperative, Magnum Photos, and occupies a special place in the canon. This retrospective monograph gathers hundreds of rolls of film Chim shot shortly after World War II for UNICEF. One of Chim's best-known projects, this series was printed by Life in 1948 and by UNICEF is 1949. However, myriad images were left unpublished, hidden from the public audience. Chim: Children of War, created in close collaboration with Chim's estate, unveils many of these never-before-seen photographs, further cementing Chim as one of the most influential photographers of our time, an image-maker whose emotional empathy remains unmatched.
We Went Back: Photographs from Europe 1933-1956 by Chim
Author: Cynthia Young, Carole Naggar, Roger Cohen
Publisher: Prestel
Year: 2013 - Pages: 304
This book traces the career of Chim, famed photojournalist and cofounder of Magnum Photos, who dedicated much of his life to documenting war and its aftermath. Born Dawid Szymin in Warsaw, Chim began his career in the early 1930s photographing for leftist magazines in Paris. In 1936, one of these magazines, Regards, sent him to the front lines of the civil war in Spain, along with comrades Robert Capa and Gerda Taro. Although war formed the backdrop of much of his reportage, Chim was an astute observer of 20th-century European politics, social life, and culture, from the beginnings of the antifascist struggle to the rebuilding of countries ravaged by World War II. Like millions of other Europeans, Chim had suffered the pain of dislocation and the loss of family in a concentration camp. His profound empathy for his subjects is evident in his postwar work on child refugees. In this volume, Chim emerges as both a talented reporter and a creator of elegant compositions of startling grace and beauty. The book places Chim's work within the broader context of 1930s-1950s photography and European politics.
Shames: Bronx Boys
Author: Stephen Shames
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Year: 2014 - Pages: 224
Bronx Boys presents an extended photo essay that chronicles the lives of these kids growing up in the Bronx. Shames captures the brutality of the times—the fights, shootings, arrests, and drug deals—that eventually left many of the young men he photographed dead or in jail. But he also records the joy and humanity of the Bronx boys, who mature, fall in love, and have children of their own. One young man Shames mentored, Martin Dones, provides riveting details of living in the Bronx and getting caught up in violence and drugs before caring adults helped him turn his life around. Challenging our perceptions of a neighborhood that is too easily dismissed as irredeemable, Bronx Boys shows us that hope can survive on even the meanest streets.
Fazal Sheikh: Ether
Author: Fazal Sheikh
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2013 - Pages: 88
The pictures in Ether--Fazal Sheikh's first book in color--were made as a way to honor the experience of death and to try to comprehend its significance. Benares (Varanasi) is one of India's sacred cities, where many Hindus come to die in the belief that they will find salvation. As he walked its streets by night, Sheikh observed sleeping figures, shrouded in blankets, lost to an oblivion that seemed, in that holy city, to offer a simulacrum of death. In watching these ambiguous figures, which hover in the imagination between a dream state, sleep and death, Sheikh recalled his own experience with his dying father and their passage together through his father's final days. He remembered it as an invaluable period of emotional connection with the body and soul of the person he knew and loved, a connection that reached back to his paternal ancestors, who had travelled south from northern India a century before. To lose oneself in sleep is to abandon the senses and leave the way open to a dream state in which mind and body separate.
Cindy Sherman
Author: Cindy Sherman, Eva Respini, Johanna Burton
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2012 - Pages: 264
Published to accompany the first major survey of Cindy Sherman's work in the United States in nearly 15 years, this publication presents a stunning range of work from the groundbreaking artist's 35-year career. Showcasing approximately 180 photographs from the mid-1970s to the present, including new works made for the exhibition and never before published, the volume is a vivid exploration of Sherman's sustained investigation into the construction of contemporary identity and the nature of representation. The book highlights major bodies of work including her seminal Untitled Film Stills (1977-80); centerfolds (1981); history portraits (1989-90); head shots (2000-2002); and two recent series on the experience and representation of aging in the context of contemporary obsessions with youth and status. An essay by curator Eva Respini provides an overview of Sherman's career, weaving together art historical analysis and discussions of the artist's working methods, and a contribution by art historian Johanna Burton offers a critical re-examination of Sherman's work in light of her recent series. A conversation between Cindy Sherman and filmmaker John Waters provides an enlightening view into the creative process.
Cindy Sherman (Phaidon Focus)
Author: Cindy Sherman
Publisher: Phaidon Press
Year: 2014 - Pages: 144
The Phaidon Focus series presents engaging, up–to–date introductions to art’s modern masters. Compact, affordable, and beautifully produced, the books in this growing series are written by top experts in their field. Each features a complete chronological survey of an artist’s life and career, interspersed throughout with one–page "Focus" essays examining specific bodies of work.
Cindy Sherman: Retrospective
Author: Cindy Sherman
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Year: 2000 - Pages: 220
American artist Cindy Sherman creates staged and manipulated photographs that draw on popular culture and art history to explore female identity. Her art embodies two developments in the art world: the impact of postmodern theory on art practice; and the rise of photography and mass-media techniques as modes of artistic expression. This volume, published on the occasion of an international touring exhibition, presents over 200 images from the breadth of Sherman's work, from the "Untitled Film Stills" of the 1970s to series such as "Centerfolds", "Fashion", "Disasters", "Fairy Tales" and "History Portraits". Essayists Cruz, Jones and Smith offer insights into Sherman's art from several vantage points, positioning it within the trajectory of feminist art history and revealing her influence since the 1970s.
Cindy Sherman: The Complete Untitled Film Stills
Author: Cindy Sherman
Publisher: The Museum of Modern Art
Year: 2003 - Pages: 164
Cindy Sherman's Untitled Film Stills, a series of 69 black-and-white photographs created between 1977 and 1980, is widely seen as one of the most original and influential achievements in recent art. Witty, provocative and searching, this lively catalogue of female roles inspired by the movies crystallizes widespread concerns in our culture, examining the ways we shape our personal identities and the role of the mass media in our lives. Sherman began making these pictures in 1977 when she was 23 years old. The first six were an experiment: fan-magazine glimpses into the life (or roles) of an imaginary blond actress, played by Sherman herself. The photographs look like movie stills--or perhaps publicity pix--purporting to catch the blond bombshell in unguarded moments at home. The protagonist is shown preening in the kitchen and lounging in the bedroom. Onto something big, Sherman tried other characters in other roles: the chic starlet at her seaside hideaway, the luscious librarian, the domesticated sex kitten, the hot-blooded woman of the people, the ice-cold sophisticate and a can-can line of other stereotypes. She eventually completed the series in 1980. She stopped, she has explained, when she ran out of clichas.
Cindy Sherman: The Early Works: Catalogue Raisonné, 1975-1977
Author: Cindy Sherman, Gabriele Schor
Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Year: 2012 - Pages: 375
For more than 30 years now, Cindy Sherman has been enacting a gamut of female roles and identities. Contrary to popular belief, the famous Untitled Film Stills (1978-80) are not Sherman's earliest works, but rather those photographs she took as a student at State University College at Buffalo, between 1975 and 1977. During those years, Sherman cast aside the career in painting she had initially imagined for herself and began to study photography: "I was meticulously copying other art and then I realized I could just use a camera and put my time into an idea instead," she later recalled. Cindy Sherman: The Early Works, 1975-1977 gathers all of the artist's work from this decisive phase, in which Sherman was formulating her conceptions of gender and identity construction, gathering her toolkit of props (wigs, makeup, costumes) and becoming friends with artists such as Robert Longo (with whom she would establish the Hallwalls gallery in New York). With nearly 300 plates, including numerous previously unknown photographs, plus scholarly research by editor Gabriele Schor, this substantial volume adds a wealth of new information to our understanding of Sherman's oeuvre.
Cindy Sherman: Untitled Horrors
Author: Cindy Sherman
Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Year: 2013 - Pages: 220
Throughout her career, Cindy Sherman (born 1954) has been interested in exposing the darker sides of human nature, noticeable both in her selection of subject matter (fairytales, disasters, sex, horror, surrealism) and in her disquieting interpretations of well-established photographic genres, such as film stills, fashion photography and society portraiture. Delving relentlessly into the more grotesque extremes of delusion, vanity and self-image, Sherman probes deeply into the masks and distractions we all employ to set apart our public and our private personae, and challenges us to consider how bizarre and unconvincing our attempts at projecting a semblance of normality can be. Attracting a certain degree of notoriety, intense and ongoing public interest as well as extensive critical acclaim, Sherman's works continue to challenge and intrigue in equal measure. This richly illustrated publication deploys a selection of works from across her career to highlight and acknowledge these particular aspects of her art. These images are accompanied by more recent work, as well as essays from well-known authors, filmmakers and artists who likewise deal with the grotesque, the uncanny and the extraordinary in their practice.
Selected Works, 1973-1981
Author: Stephen Shore
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2017 - Pages: 328
In this new volume, Stephen Shore: Selected Works, 1973–1981, Aperture has invited an international group of fifteen photographers, curators, authors, and cultural figures-from Wes Anderson to Hans Ulrich Obrist-to curate selections of ten photographs each from a new cache of images from Shore's Uncommon Places archive.
Uncommon Places: The Complete Works
Author: Stephen Shore
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2015 - Pages: 208
Originally published in 1982, Stephen Shore's legendary Uncommon Places has influenced more than a generation of photographers. Shore was among the first artists to take color beyond the domain of advertising and fashion photography, and his large-format color work on the American vernacular landscape inaugurated a vital photographic tradition. Uncommon Places: The Complete Works, published by Aperture in 2005, presented a definitive collection of the landmark series, and in the span of a decade has become a contemporary classic. Now, for this lushly produced reissue, the artist has added nearly 20 rediscovered images and a statement explaining what it means to expand a classic series. Like Robert Frank and Walker Evans before him, Shore discovered a hitherto unarticulated vision of America via highway and camera. Approaching his subjects with cool objectivity, Shore retains precise systems of gestures in composition and light through which a hotel bedroom or a building on a side street assumes both an archetypal aura and an ambiguously personal importance. An essay by critic and curator Stephan Schmidt-Wulffen and a conversation with Shore by writer Lynne Tillman examine his methodology and elucidate his roots in Pop and Conceptual art. The texts are illustrated with reproductions from Shore's earlier series American Surfaces and Amarillo: Tall in Texas.
Ethiopia: Peoples of the Omo Valley
Author: Hans Silvester
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
Year: 2007 - Pages: 464
In this ambitious work, Hans Silvester turns his photographic eye toward ancient Africa, the birthplace of humanity. Silvester was essentially adopted by his subjects during his travels, and his stunning color photographs present a rare, intimate view of their world. The first volume of this deluxe two-volume set presents the everyday lives of the Omo people, their rituals, parades, children’s games, and even their battles. In the second volume, each photograph becomes a masterpiece of abstract art, revealing close-ups of the tribes’ traditional body paintings. Silvester’s accompanying text traces his journey to the Horn of Africa, revealing the fascinating beauty of a world now in danger of extinction.
Natural Fashion: Tribal Decoration from Africa
Author: Hans Silvester
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Year: 2009 - Pages: 168
The scene of tribal conflicts and guerrilla incursions, Ethiopia’s Omo Valley is also home to fascinating rites and traditions that have survived for thousands of years. The nomadic people who inhabit the valley share a gift for body painting and elaborate adornments borrowed from nature, and Hans Silvester has captured the results in a series of photographs made over the course of numerous trips. 160 color photographs
Siskind: Another Photographic Reality
Author: Aron Siskind
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Year: 2014 - Pages: 200
Aaron Siskind (1903–1991) was a major figure in the history of American photography. A leading documentary photographer who was active in the New York Photo League in the 1930s, Siskind moved beyond the social realism of his early work as he increasingly came to view photography as a visual language of signs, metaphors, and symbols—the equivalent of poetry and music. Through the forties and ifties, he developed new techniques to photograph details and fragments of ordinary, commonplace materials. This radical new work transformed Siskind's image-making from straight photography to abstraction, from documentation to expressive art. His concern with shape, line, gesture, and the picture plane prompted immediate comparison with abstract expressionist painting, particularly with the art of Franz Kline and Robert Motherwell. It took some years for Siskind's unprecedented photography to gain full acceptance, but, by the 1970s, he was an acknowledged master, publishing and exhibiting widely. Siskind was also one of the founding donors who established the archive at the Center for Creative Photography.
The Big Book
Author: W. Eugene Smith
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Year: 2013 - Pages: 341
W. Eugene Smith, an icon in the field of twentieth-century photography, is best known as the master of the humanistic photographic essay. Smith’s most expressive and frequently reproduced images—World War II combat, the country doctor and nurse-midwife, Pittsburgh, Albert Schweitzer in Africa, rural Spanish villagers, and the mentally ill in Haiti—have altered our perception and understanding of the world.
W. Eugene Smith
Author: W. Eugene Smith
Publisher: La Fabrica
Year: 2011 - Pages: 240
The American photojournalist W. Eugene Smith revolutionized the photo-essay form with the works he published in Life magazine between 1948 and 1956. This monograph reproduces images from six classic sequences of this era: Country Doctor (1948), which portrays the selfless and sometimes frustrating work of a doctor in rural America; Spanish Village (1950), perhaps the most powerful photographic study of 1950s Spain; Nurse Midwife (1951), which examines the life of a black woman in the American south; A Man of Mercy (1954), which documents Dr. Albert Schweitzer's humanitarian work in Africa; Pittsburgh (1955), Smith's first freelance assignment, previously unpublished; and Minamata 91971-1973), a photo-essay recording the effects caused by a mercury spill in a region inhabited by Japanese fishermen. Together, these six classic documents of twentieth-century photography affirm Smith as an impassioned conscience, with practical ends in mind for his work: "I put such passion and energy into my photographic work that, more than their being just for art's sake, I prefer to think that my photographs push someone to action, to do something, to solve something," he one wrote. This volume includes previously unpublished writings by Smith that elucidate his field techniques and guiding principles, as well as the memoir "A Walk to a Paradise Garden," which tells the tale of his most acclaimed photograph.
Self & Others: Portrait as Autobiography
Author: Aline Smithson
Publisher: The Magenta Foundation
Year: 2015 - Pages: 214
Created over an almost 20-year span and drawing from 18 bodies of work, this is the first published monograph of Aline Smithson’s work and features her defining series Arrangement in Green and Black: Portrait of the Photographer’s Mother. From black-and-white to hand-painted photographs, this collection of portraits combines humor and family to create a universal expression of motherhood, to capture the essence of childhood, and to examine created realities, the poignancy of childhood, and the pathos of aging and relationships. She brings a background in painting and fashion to her images, but at the heart of her work is her ability to recognize the inner self of her subjects. The photographer considers all her portraits as a reflection of herself and the stories she wants to tell and in this way she has created a visual language that is her own unique autobiography.
Niagara
Artist: Alec Soth
Author: Alec Soth
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2006 - Pages: 144
By way of follow-up to his critically acclaimed debut monograph Sleeping by the Mississippi, Alec Soth turns his eye to another iconic body of water, Niagara Falls. And as with his photographs of the Mississippi, these images are less about natural wonder than human desire. "I went to Niagara for the same reason as the honeymooners and suicide jumpers," says Soth, "the relentless thunder of the Falls just calls for big passion." The subject may be hot, but the pictures are quiet, the rigorously composed and richly detailed products of a large-format 8x10 camera. Working over the course of two years on both the American and Canadian sides of the Falls, Soth edited the results of his labors down to a tight and surprising album. He depicts newlyweds and naked lovers, motel parking lots, pawnshop wedding rings and love letters from the subjects he photographed. We read about teenage crushes, workplace affairs, heartbreak and suicide. Oscar Wilde wrote, "The sight of the stupendous waterfall must be one of the earliest, if not the keenest, disappointments in American married life." Niagara brings viewers both the passion and the disappointment--a remarkable portrayal of modern love and its aftermath.
Sleeping by the Mississippi
Artist: Alec Soth
Author: Alec Soth
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2004 - Pages: 120
Evolving from a series of road trips along the Mississippi River, Alec Soth's Sleeping by the Mississippi captures America's iconic yet oft-neglected "third coast." Soth's richly descriptive, large-format color photographs present an eclectic mix of individuals, landscapes, and interiors. Sensuous in detail and raw in subject, Sleeping by the Mississippi elicits a consistent mood of loneliness, longing, and reverie. "In the book's 46 ruthlessly edited pictures," writes Anne Wilkes Tucker, "Soth alludes to illness, procreation, race, crime, learning, art, music, death, religion, redemption, politics, and cheap sex." Like Robert Frank's classic The Americans, Sleeping by the Mississippi merges a documentary style with a poetic sensibility. The Mississippi is less the subject of the book than its organizing structure. Not bound by a rigid concept or ideology, the series is created out of a quintessentially American spirit of wanderlust.
Songbook
Artist: Alec Soth
Author: Alec Soth
Publisher: Mack
Year: 2014 - Pages: 144
Known for his haunting portraits of solitary Americans in Sleeping by the Mississippi and Broken Manual, Alec Soth has recently turned his lens toward community life in the country. To aid in his search, Soth assumed the increasingly obsolescent role of community newspaper reporter. From 2012-2014, Soth traveled state by state while working on his self-published newspaper, The LBM Dispatch, as well as on assignment for the New York Times and others. From upstate New York to Silicon Valley, Soth attended hundreds of meetings, dances, festivals and communal gatherings in search of human interaction in an era of virtual social networks. With Songbook, Soth has stripped these pictures of their news context in order to highlight the longing for connection at their root. Fragmentary, funny and sad, Songbook is a lyrical depiction of the tension between American individualism and the desire to be united. Alec Soth (b. 1969) is a photographer born and based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. His photographs have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including the 2004 Whitney and Sao Paulo Biennials. In 2008, a survey exhibition of Soth's work was exhibited at Jeu de Paume in Paris and Fotomuseum Winterthur in Switzerland. In 2010, the Walker Art Center produced a traveling survey exhibition of Soth's work entitled From Here To There. Soth has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship (2013). In 2008, Soth founded his own publishing company, Little Brown Mushroom. Soth is represented by Sean Kelly in New York, Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis, Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco, and is a member of Magnum Photos.
Bordello
Artist: Vee Speers
Author: Vee Speers
Publisher: EarBOOKS
Year: 2006 - Pages: 120
Bordello is pure seduction. The images presented by internationally renowned photographer Vee Speers are inspired by the 1920s - an era of extravagant life style and sexual decadence. Shot in French bordellos, perfectly orchestrated and artistically adapted, the photographs take the viewer into the world of temptation - erotic, lascivious, and nostalgically arranged. Music CDs: French chansons, by Edith Piaf, Charles Trenet, Yves Montand, Lucienne Boyer, Damia, and Frehel musically emphasize this electrifying world of images. She shows beauty where beauty can be terribly absent. Karl Lagerfeld.
The Birthday Party
Artist: Vee Speers
Author: Vee Speers
Publisher: Dewi Lewis Publishing
Year: 2009 - Pages: 96
For the past fifteen years, Vee Speers has been based in Paris, working in fashion, photojournalism, and fine art photography. Widely exhibited throughout Europe, the United States, Brazil, Mexico, Japan, and Australia, her work has also been seen in publications including The Sunday Times, Harpers+Queen, GQ, Arena, and Esquire Susan Bright is an independent curator and writer on photography. Author of the highly successful book 'Art Photography Now' (Thames & Hudson, 2006), she has worked with the National Portrait Gallery and Tate Britain. Recent curatorial projects include Face of Fashion for the National Portrait Gallery, London, and 'How We Are: Photographing Britain' (co-curated with Val Williams) for Tate Britain, London.
The Pigs
Author: Carlos Spottorno
Publisher: RM/Phree
Year: 2014 - Pages: 112
The acronym "PIGS" is a media-coined term referring to the European Union's economically weakest countries--Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain. Carlos Spottorno's The Pigs is a tragicomic vision of these countries' stereotypes, utilizing the format of the influential magazine The Economist.
Stein / Negative: Me, Blondie, and the Advent of Punk
Author: Chris Stein
Publisher: Rizzoli
Year: 2014 - Pages: 208
On the occasion of Blondie’s fortieth anniversary, Chris Stein shares his iconic and mostly unpublished photographs of Debbie Harry and the cool creatures of the ’70s and ’80s New York rock scene. While a student at the School of Visual Arts, Chris Stein photographed the downtown New York scene of the early ’70s, where he met Deborah Harry and cofounded Blondie. Their blend of punk, dance, and hip-hop spawned a totally new sound, and Stein’s photographs helped establish Harry as an international fashion and music icon. In photos and stories direct from Stein, brilliant writer of hits like "Rapture" and "Heart of Glass," this book provides a fascinating snapshot of the period before and during Blondie’s huge rise, by someone who was part of and who helped to shape the early punk music scene—at CBGB, Andy Warhol’s Factory, and early Bowery. Stars such as David Bowie, the Ramones, Joan Jett, and Iggy Pop were part of Stein’s world, as were fascinating downtown characters like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Richard Hell, Stephen Sprouse, Anya Phillips, Divine, and many others. As captured by one of its greatest artists and instigators, and designed by Shepard Fairey, this book is a must-have celebration of the new-wave and punk scene, whose influence on music and fashion is just as relevant today as it was four decades ago.
The Last Sitting
Artist: Bert Stern
Author: Bert Stern
Publisher: Random House Mondadori
Year: 2007 - Pages: 128
Bert Stern, the famous commercial and fashion photographer of the 60s, was the last to be granted a sitting by Marilyn Monroe six weeks before her tragic death. The three-day session yielded amazing pictures—fashion, portrait, and nude studies—of indescribable sensual and human vibrancy, of which Mr. Stern’s favorites are published in this book.
Alfred Stieglitz: Camera Work
Author: Alfred Stieglitz
Publisher: Taschen
Year: 2013 - Pages: 552
Highlights from Stieglitz's legendary photo journal (1903-1917) "This has to be the 'must buy' book of the decade—no photographic library will be complete without it. " - mono, UK Photographer, writer, publisher, and curator Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) was a visionary far ahead of his time. Around the turn of the 20th century, he founded the Photo-Secession, a progressive movement concerned with advancing the creative possibilities of photography, and by 1903 began publishing Camera Work, an avant-garde magazine devoted to voicing the ideas, both in images and words, of the Photo-Secession. Camera Work was the first photo journal whose focus was visual, rather than technical, and its illustrations were of the highest quality hand-pulled photogravure printed on Japanese tissue. This book brings together a broad selection from the journal’s 50 issues.
Alfred Stieglitz: Masters of Photography Series
Author: Alfred Stieglitz
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 1997 - Pages: 96
Alfred Stieglitz was one of the most important cultural forces in twentieth-century America. As founder of the Photo Secession movement and editor of the influential Camera Work he eschewed the prevailing “artiness” of pictorialist photography, preferring clarity of vision and “crystallized awareness.” In galleries such as “291” and An American Place he showed and championed the work of modern artists from the US and Europe. As a photographer, editor, and gallery director Stieglitz was a powerful influence on photography and on American art in general.
Paul Strand: Sixty Years of Photographs
Artist: Paul Strand
Author: Paul Strand, Calvin Tomkins
Publisher: Aperture Foundation
Year: 2009 - Pages: 184
Paul Strand: Sixty Years of Photographs, a long-unavailable Aperture classic, is one of the most comprehensive surveys of the power and force of a major photographic figure of our time. Before his death in 1976 at age eighty-five, Strand combed his photographic prints and his many books with an eye to the completion of this volume. Seen here is the summation of a lifework, from the first abstract photographs to the series of plant photographs taken in the last years of his life. Also included is a rarely examined series of filmsUbrilliant, unprecedented documentaries that foreshadowed Italian neo-realism and the new cinema of the post-war years. The re-release of this volume, which features the famous biographical profile by Calvin Tomkins and excerpts from Strand's correspondence, interviews, and other documents, makes one of photography's major artists newly accessible.
Zoe Strauss: 10 Years
Author: Zoe Strauss
Publisher: Philadelphia Museum Distribution
Year: 2012 - Pages: 270
With little formal training as a photographer or artist, Zoe Strauss (b. 1970) founded the Philadelphia Public Art Project in 1995 with the aim of exhibiting art in nontraditional venues. Five years later, she began using photography as the most direct means of representing her chosen subjects. Zoe Strauss: 10 Years offers a midcareer assessment of Strauss's achievement to date, and the first full account of her celebrated ten-year project, beginning in 2001, to exhibit her photographs under an elevated section of Interstate 95 in Philadelphia.
Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse: Ponte City
Author: Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2014 - Pages: 192
ikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse worked at Ponte City, the iconic Johannesburg apartment building which is Africa's tallest residential skyscraper, for more than six years. They photographed the residents and documented the building-every door, the view from every window, the image on every television screen. This remarkable body of images is presented here in counterpoint with an extensive archive of found material and historical documents. The visual story is integrated with a sustained sequence of essays and documentary texts. In the essays, some of South Africa's leading scholars and writers explore Ponte City's unique place in Johannesburg and in the imagination of its citizens. What emerges is a complex portrait of a place shaped by contending projections, a single, unavoidable building seen as refuge and monstrosity, dreamland and dystopia, a lightning rod for a society's hopes and fears, and always a beacon to navigate by. This long-term project obtained the Discovery Award at Les Rencontres d'Arles in 2011.
Josef Sudek: The Legacy of a Deeper Vision
Artist: Josef Sudek
Author: Josef Sudek
Publisher: Collection Art Gallery Ontario
Year: 2012 - Pages: 288
During a legendary career that spanned almost six decades, Czech photographer Josef Sudek, the “poet of Prague,” developed a craftsmanship and technical virtuosity that was unparalleled among his contemporaries. Early in his career, though the prevailing art movements of the 1920s and ’30s included cubism, surrealism, and the Czech avant-garde, Sudek sought his own approach characterized by a striking mastery of light. Copiously illustrated with photographs from the Art Gallery of Ontario—which will also exhibit the photographs through December 2012—this book takes readers on a journey through Sudek’s life and work. Included here are essays by some of the foremost writers on Sudek’s work, including curator Maia-Mari Sutnik, photo-historian Antonín Dufek, Canadian Art editor Richard Rhodes, and photographer Geoffrey James. Sudek’s photographs also feature heavily in Irish novelist John Banville’s Prague Pictures: Portraits of a City, which forms a biographical portrait of the photographer, and several excerpts from the book are included here. Rounding out the volume is a detailed biographical chronology by Czech art historian and Sudek expert Anna Fárová. The photographs in this book cover every stage of Sudek’s extensive career, shedding light on his lifelong quest to perfect his photographic vision.
Dioramas
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto
Publisher: Damiani
Year: 2014 - Pages: 118
Hiroshi Sugimoto (born 1948) began his four-decade-long series Dioramas in 1974, inspired by a trip to the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Surrounded by the museum's elaborate, naturalistic dioramas, Sugimoto realized that the scenes jumped to life when looked at with one eye closed. Recreated forestry and stretches of uninhabited land, wild, crouching animals against painted backgrounds and even prehistoric humans seemed entirely convincing with this visual trick, which launched a conceptual exploration of the photographic medium that has traversed his entire career. Focusing his camera on individual dioramas as though they were entirely surrounding scenes, omitting their frames and educational materials and ensuring that no reflections enter the shot, his subjects appear as if photographed in their natural habitats. He also explores the power of photography to create history--in his own words, "photography functions as a fossilization of time." Hiroshi Sugimoto: Dioramas narrates a story of the cycle of life, death and rebirth, from prehistoric aquatic life to the propagation of reptile and animal life to Homo sapiens' destruction of the earth, circling back to its renewal, where flora and fauna flourish without man. Here Sugimoto writes his own history of the world, an artist's creation myth.
Hiroshi Sugimoto
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto, Kerry Brougher
Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Year: 2010 - Pages: 400
Genius of the large-format camera, the long exposure and the silverprint, New York-based photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto has made pictures that seem to contain whole aeons of time within themselves, and suggest an infinite palette of tonal wealth in blacks, grays and whites. Many of these images have now become a part of art culture's popular image bank (as U2's use of Sugimoto's "Boden Sea" for the cover of their 2009 album, No Line on the Horizon, demonstrated), while simultaneously evoking photography's earliest days: "I probably call myself a postmodern-experienced pre-postmodern modernist," he once joked to an interviewer. This absolutely exquisite retrospective is an expanded edition of Hatje Cantz's 2005 volume. It is the first to feature works from all of Sugimoto's series to date: his celebrated portraits of wax figures, his incredible seascapes that seem to suggest a person's first conscious view of the ocean, the extremely long exposures of theaters which elevate the white, luminescent cinema screen and transform it into a magical image of an altar and the fascinating dioramas of scientific display cases, which invite us to travel far into the past. Additions to the original edition are two new groups of works, "Lightning Fields" (2006) and "Photogenic Drawings" (2007).
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Nature of Light
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto
Publisher: Ram Distribution
Year: 2011 - Pages: 154
This catalog, produced in conjunction with Sugimoto's upcoming exhibition at the Izu Photo Museum in Japan, documents this important artist's recent investigations on the science and the presentation of photography. Documenting in detail Sugimoto's architectural and landscape design of the new Izu Photo Museum, the book is at once a reinvention of the artist as architect, as it is an insightful guide to Sugimoto's interest in the earliest beginnings of photography. Instigated by the urging of his friend, Pop art icon Richard Hamilton, Sugimoto went to England to visit the museum of William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the negative/positive photographic process. Finding common ground with Talbots' polymathic interests in art and science, this book details images from Sugimoto's Photogenic Drawing Talbot pieces, where Sugimoto reinterprets 15 unprinted negatives from Talbot's early studies, as well as 15 images from the artist's Lightning Field series. Includes text by critic Minoru Shimizu.
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto
Publisher: Damiani
Year: 2015 - Pages: 272
For more than 30 years, Hiroshi Sugimoto has traveled the world photographing its seas, producing an extended meditation on the passage of time and the natural history of the earth reduced to its most basic, primordial substances: water and air. Always capturing the sea at a moment of absolute tranquility, Sugimoto has composed all the photographs identically, with the horizon line precisely bifurcating each image. The repetition of this strict format reveals the uniqueness of each meeting of sea and sky, with the horizon never appearing exactly the same way twice. The photographs are romantic yet absolutely rigorous, apparently universal but exceedingly specific. The second in a series of luxurious, beautifully produced volumes each focused on specific bodies of Sugimoto's work, Seascapes presents the complete series of more than 200 Seascapes for the first time in one publication. Some of the photographs included have never before been reproduced.
On the beach
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto
Publisher: Amana
Year: 2014 - Pages: 68
In 1990, photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto visited the seas of New Zealand. On one particular deserted beach, he discovered hundreds of car parts, probably from the 1960s, disintegrated and corroded by decades under the waves. Photographing them individually, he imagined that human civilization had ended, thinking that the sight of crafted objects rotting away is at once dreadful and beautiful. This series of heavily black-and-white images of decaying metal on the sand are reproduced in this large-format photo book, accompanied by an introspective text by Sugimoto on the nature of the sea and the inexorable, practically incomprehensible, passage of time.
Portraits
Author: Hiroshi Sugimoto, Tracey Bashkoff
Publisher: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Year: 2003 - Pages: 170
Hiroshi Sugimoto here turns to the wax figures he first explored in his Dioramas series. Combining poetic imagination and noble elegance, this body of work presents life-size black-and-white portraits of historical figures--Henry VIII, each of his six wives and Oscar Wilde, among others--photographed in wax museums and dramatically lit so as to create haunting images. Featuring an interview with the artist by Tracey Bashkoff and essays by Carol Armstrong, Norman Bryson, Thomas Kellein and Nancy Spector, this book offers fresh insights into the work of this important contemporary artist. Portraits was created specially for the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin and was exhibited at the former Guggenheim Soho.
Grace
Author: Elisabeth Sunday
Publisher: Nazraeli Press
Year: 2012 - Pages: 60
For 26 years, Elisabeth Sunday has found her muse in Africa: a place of origins, devastating beauty, great troubles and unyielding expressions of life. She has traveled alone and lived among various original peoples who amidst a changing world, have clung tenaciously to traditional ways of life. From the hunter-gatherers dwelling in the primeval forests of the Congo Basin, to the nomadic tribes inhabiting the vast stretches of the Sahara Desert, Sunday's photographs reveal an interplay of invisible forces that connect her subjects with the world of nature. Utilizing a flexible mirror of her own design, Sunday photographs reflections that blend and dissolve the boundaries between her figures and their environment. Sunday's images express an intimacy with a corresponding strength derived from that relationship. She writes: "Mirror photography is much more than photographing a reflection, it produces a visual alchemy that combines the physical world with that of the great mystery . . . and captures some element that remains hidden in straight photography." Elisabeth Sunday's work has been widely exhibited and collected throughout the United States and abroad. "Grace", the artist's first monograph, opens with an eloquent and enlightening essay by Deborah Willis. The book is printed in an oversized (14 x 17 inch) format on uncoated art paper and bound in Japanese cloth. This first printing is limited to 1,000 copies.
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