Martine Franck

Belgian Photographer | Born: 1938 - Died: 2012
Born in Antwerp, Martine Franck spent her childhood in the United States and in England. She studied art history at the University of Madrid, then at the Ecole du Louvre in Paris, where she presented a thesis on “the influence of cubism on sculpture”. She began her career as a photographer as the assistant of Eliot Elisofon and Gjon Mili at Life magazine. She was part of the first Vu agency in 1970, and helped found the agency Viva two years later. She joined Magnum in 1980. She made portraits of artists and writers, but her main focus was humanitarian reportages. She photographed every production of the Théâtre du Soleil since its founding. She began collaborating with the association Little Brothers of the Poor in 1985. In 1995, she realized, with Robert Delpire, a 26-minute film called “Ariane et Compagnie: le Théâtre du Soleil”. In 1998 her work was exhibited at the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, in Paris. In 2000, she collaborated with Fabienne Strouvé on the film “Retour en Irlande avec Martine Franck, photographe” (Return to Ireland with Martine Franck, photographer) (France 3). In 2001 and 2002, Martine Franck concluded a series of photographs on Tory Island, Ireland, and another on Tibetan Buddhist children in India and Nepal. In 2002, her work was exhibited at the Musée de la Vie Romantique, in Paris. In 2004, she photographed the Fables de La Fontaine, a show staged by Robert Wilson at the Comédie-Française, a book titled “Fables” is published by Editions Actes Sud Arles. In 2007, “Martine Franck”, number 111 of the collection Photo poche, Actes Sud is dedicated to Franck, with text by Annick Cojean. In 2007, “Martine Franck” was published by Phaïdon, London, with text by Louise Baring. In 2010, Chanel TOKYO exhibited a series of photos by Martine Franck entitled “Femmes” (Women). In October 2011, the Maison Européenne de la Photographie exhibited 62 portraits of artists “coming from somewhere else” photographed by Martine Franck from 1965 to 2010. In March/April 2012 hundreds of portraits of artists by Martine Franck are exhibited at the Galerie Claude Bernard, in Paris. Martine Franck founded in Paris with Henri Cartier-Bresson, the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, which became an officially recognised foundation on March 11, 2002, and became its President in 2004.
Source Magnum Photos
Women / Femmes
Author: Martine Franck
Publisher: Steidl
Year: 2010 - Pages: 156
"Taking a portrait of someone--be it man or woman--starts with a conversation. It is important for me to try and catch the person when they are listening or when they are in a pensive mood or have forgotten my presence. I rarely ask a person to pose for me as I prefer that they reveal themselves as they wish. For me the eyes and the hands are most important and when possible I like to use natural light. All through my life as a photographer I have made a point of photographing women whom I admire, who have done something special with their lives, who have protested against their fate, also those close to me like my daughter and grand daughter and intimate friends all of whom appear in this collection." --Martine Franck. Martine Franck has travelled the globe photographing the social landscape. This book brings together a selection of her photographs of women, from factory workers in Bucharest to geishas in Kyoto and encompassing the film stars, artists, writers and performers she has photographed since the 1960s. It is both a celebration of women and a testimony to the unique vision and empathy of a great photographer.
 
One Day To The Next
Author: Martine Franck
Publisher: Aperture
Year: 2005 - Pages: 168
Martine Franck: One Day to the Next includes more than 100 images that capture singular visual moments with elegance and wit. Presented here is a selection of this highly regarded photographer's favorite images from the last 30 years, covering subject matter from the inquisitiveness of childhood to the quirks of old age, from strange and rugged landscapes to the rhythms of crowds. Whether photographing artists and writers such as Michel Foucault and Marc Chagall, or Tibetan Buddhist refugees in India and Nepal, Franck sees photography as “a frontier, a barrier of sorts that one is constantly breaking down so as to get closer to the subject.”
 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
ADVERTISEMENT
Join Us!
Sign-up for emails - we'd love to have you!
Be up-to-date with call for entries, deadlines and other news about Exhibitions, Galleries, Publications, & Special Events

 
 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
 
 
TAKES U TO THE NEXT LEVEL
 
 
Since 2005, your guide through contemporary art from a French perspective to let you make exciting choices