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5 Ways to Use Festivals as a Photo Subject

5 Ways to Use Festivals as a Photo Subject
5 Ways to Use Festivals as a Photo Subject
Festivals are characterized with color and entertainment, both of which make them a perfect photography subject. The organization and effort put into a festival makes it an excellent opportunity for photographers to build on or show their skills, as well as capture amazing photos.

Successful photography isn't an easy thing to accomplish. Finding the perfect location, timing and perfect moment can be very hard. But, thanks to festivals, you have the perfect combination as well as the timing for it. Whether it is a feasting festival or some kind of a religious event, there are plenty of things you can capture as a photographer.

"The main goal of such events is to entertain and amaze. If you capture this moment into an ever-lasting photography, that amazement can last forever and touch many people who haven't attended the actual celebration." explains George Jeffrey, a photography expert and blogger at Easyessay.

However, to do this well, you have to know the best tricks for photographing a festival. Here are the top five things you must master before you do your festival photography.

1. Have a Good Plan

Great photography needs a good plan. Yes, you can come across an amazing photography opportunity and capture the photo of a lifetime. But, if you plan to photograph an entire event, you'll hardly come across as many lucky situations as you wish for.

This is why you need a plan in place. Learn where the festival is held and know your way around the location. See what their schedule is like who does what and when. If the festival is popular or great, there'll probably be many people and photographers there, so plan the time when you'll find your position before it gets too crowded.

If you're attending a local festival, visiting the location a day or two before the actual event is the smartest decision you can make. This will help you move around when the crowd comes and learn about the best photo-shooting spots.

But, if you're planning to attend a festival that's further away, you can always check the Google Maps or look at other people's shots, including photographers and fans. In most cases, festivals are held every year at the same location. Looking at photos other people have made will tell you which spots work and which doesn't. And if the repertoire is about the same each year, you'll know what to shot from which angle and what to avoid.

When you visit the location or start your search of the festival, research the people who entertain the audience. You can find many things about these people online, things that will help you learn what your best shots might be and what to pay most attention, too. If you know what the best parts of the festivals will be ahead, you'll know where to locate your camera and when to start shooting.

2. Arrive Early to the Festival

No matter how hard you've planned, you'll still have to get there early to find a great spot. If you are late, you'll probably have many troubles trying to find a place that isn't crowded or a frame that has other people in it. "Depending on how popular the festival is, getting there late often mean that you'll have many rows of heads right there in front of your camera." explains Nicole Asana, a photography expert at Bestessay.

This also applies if you have a lot of equipment. You can't get to the festival right before the beginning and expect to set everything in time to capture the start, especially not when the place has many people. Even if you're lucky enough to find a great spot to take photos at a festival, setting up will probably take some time, too.

Planning ahead will help you establish how much time you'll need to spend before the festival starts at the location.

3. Find a High Spot

This is a very important tip if you're attending a big festival. In big festivals, even if you get there early and get a great spot somewhere in the front rows, you're highly likely to be pushed aside or be constantly disrupted by the crowd around you. That's why in the crowds, it is best to find a spot higher up, one that will let you achieve a better shot and prevent people from ruining your amazing photos.

So, when you get on the spot, find a high, high location. "The ideal spot to take festival photos is a place where no one can raise a hand and ruin a great photo. Just find a spot, join the people below you, and raise your own hand to see if it is in the way of your lens. If it isn't, you've found the best location." speaks Mickey Lennox, a photography enthusiast and expert at essayhave.

Of course, this doesn't mean that you should test your limits or risk getting kicked out of the festival. Find a safe high spot, one that doesn't put you at a risk to hurt yourself or prompts people to expel you from the festival. If you're lucky enough, you'll be attending a festival that's on a hill. These are the easiest places to find a prime spot and be higher than the crowd.

You should remember that, when the sun sets, photos are better when done from a close distance. So, as the end of the day approaches, be prepared to take your equipment and move closer. Thankfully, this is the time when the crowd subsides for most festivals, so you shouldn't have many problems when you try to do this.

4. Find Many Festivals to Attend

This sounds obvious but, in the pursuit of good photography, people tend to choose only the most popular festivals. The truth is, many small and local festivals can provide you with some amazing photos. The biggest and most versatile festivals have the most colors and photography opportunities, but they are also the hardest to catch because of the crowd and the size of the event itself.

If you want to become great at capturing festival photos, you need the practice. When you shoot local festivals, you can take a great place and avoid big crowds, plan on the spot and capture great photos in the process.

You'd be surprised how great a small festival in a town nearby can be, and how many great opportunities for shooting it can provide you with. If you aren't experienced in festival photography, you'll hardly find the spot and time to make as great photos in the popular and big festivals, as the ones you'll make here.

Of course, you shouldn't limit yourself to small festivals only. Use these to practice and grab some nice photos, but also shoot festivals from all around the world. There are plenty of events you shouldn't miss out on and once you learn how wonderful these experiences can be, you'll probably want to see as many festivals as you can.

Grab your camera on every vacation you're making. Odds are there'll be a festival nearby, which is a great chance for you to learn more about the culture, have some fun, but also make amazing photos while you're there. Since people in festivals are dressed to show and impress, they're very unlikely to mind you taking their photos.

5. Add Some Color

Festivals equal colors and shapes, patterns and decorations of all kinds. Naturally, these make for lively and beautiful images, which is probably why you've decided to shoot at such an event. People who take part of a festival will more than likely let you take their photos, so don't be afraid to ask.

When you research for a good photo opportunity, look for colors. Take many portraits of colorful clothing and participants this will give your photos a unique and human touch.

Taking photographs of people is much more difficult than taking photos of the festival in general. You won't be able to keep the people for a long time, posing for you to make a great photo. Therefore, take as many photos as you can and include as many colors as possible in them. After all, that's the purpose of shooting a festival.

While doing this, don't get hung up on making the best portrait. The goal is to actually enjoy the festival while making beautiful photos. You won't be able to capture the beauty of it unless you let yourself drown into it. Spend some time off after a bit of photo-shooting to soak in the festival atmosphere. This will let you give into the spirit of the people, allowing you to take better portraits afterward.

Conclusion

Festivals present photographers with a beautiful opportunity to create colorful, actionable, and influential photos. The more you shoot at festivals, the better you'll become at it, but you'll also learn of the marvels and beauties these festivals carry with them.

All about Michael Gorman
Michael Gorman is a greatly skilled writer at the professional Australian service australianwritings.com. In addition to his full-time job at this company, he constantly contributes with his talents and qualifications to a popular thesis writing service, as well as writes blogs for many popular sites online. If you wish to reach out, contact Michael via Twitter or Facebook.

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