Exhibitions: California

Carmel
Strange Things
Weston Gallery
March 18, 2017 to April 30, 2017
6th avenue & Dolores
Carmel, California - CA93923
Maggie Taylor is an artist who lives amid the Spanish moss and live oaks at the edge of a small swamp on the outskirts of Gainesville, Florida. She was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1961, and moved to Florida at the age of 11. Her childhood was spent watching countless hours of situation comedies and science fiction on television; later she received a philosophy degree from Yale University. A little later she got a master's degree in photography from the University of Florida.
La Jolla
Americans Seen by Sage Sohier
Joseph Bellows Gallery
April 15, 2017 to May 31, 2017
7661 Girard Avenue
La Jolla, California - CA92037
Joseph Bellows Gallery is pleased to announce its upcoming solo exhibition, Americans Seen, by Sage Sohier. The exhibition will open on April 15th and continue through May 31st, 2017. An opening reception will be held with the artist on Saturday, April 15th, from 6 - 8pm. This exhibition marks the artists first solo exhibition at gallery. Americans Seen will present a key selection of Sohier's black and white photographs of people in their environments. Taken in the late 1970's to the early 1980s her portraits reveal a particular time and place. Distinctly American, yet collectively grounded in their expression of the human condition, her exceptional photographs show our oftenstrange expression of the daily rituals that bring meaning to our life. Joseph Bellows Gallery will be exhibiting Sohier's vintage gelatin silver prints from this series. Americans Seen will also be celebrated by a forthcoming monograph by Nazraeli Press.
Los Angeles
L.A. Exuberance: New Gifts by Artists
Los Angeles County Museum of Art - LACMA
October 30, 2016 to April 2, 2017
5905 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, California - CA90036
Since LACMA's establishment, living artists have played an instrumental role in understanding the museum's encyclopedic collection through a contemporary lens. L.A. Exuberance: Artist Gifts to LACMA features a selection of works that were given to the museum for its 50th anniversary, as part of a campaign led by artist Catherine Opie. The exhibition features additions to the collection by Edgar Arceneaux, John Baldessari, Uta Barth, Larry Bell, Tacita Dean, Sam Durant, Ken Gonzales-Day, Mark Hagen, Friedrich Kunath, Charles Gaines, Glenn Kaino, Sterling Ruby, James Welling, Brenna Youngblood, Mario Ybarra, Jr., and others. This exhibition marks the culmination of LACMA's 50th anniversary year, one that began with historic gifts to the museum represented in 50 for 50: Gifts on the Occasion of LACMA's Anniversary.
Los Angeles
Siri Kaur "Crow
Kopeikin Gallery
March 11, 2017 to April 22, 2017
2766 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, California - CA90034
Crow’s Field is the name Kaur and her childhood friends gave an unclaimed strip of farmland where she grew up in rural New England. Between the forest and the road, this acreage became a magical no-man’s-land where fantasy and reality blurred.
Los Angeles
Malick Sidibé Chemises
M+B
March 18, 2017 to April 22, 2017
612 North Almont Drive
Los Angeles, California - CA90069
M+B is pleased to present Malick Sidibé: Chemises, an exhibition of vintage prints by the internationally acclaimed photographer. Positioned at the juncture of Mali's independence from France in 1960 and a period of rapid modernization, Sidibé’s candid photographs of young people chronicle the joy, exuberance and confidence of that era's youth revolution. This selection of street scenes and party views has never before been exhibited and offers a unique opportunity to see the work in their original and most fundamental form. The exhibition will run from March 18 through April 22, 2017, with an opening reception on Saturday, March 18 from 6 to 8 pm. Sidibé is widely celebrated for his black-and-white studies of popular culture. His photographs were among the first to convey the atmosphere and vibrancy of the capital, Bamako, during a time of immense cultural change. Highly sought after as a portrait photographer, Sidibé also photographed all the popular events and ceremonies in Mali and captured the explosion of interest in music and fashion. A ubiquitous presence at the late night parties and social clubs called “grins,” Sidibé used a 35mm camera that allowed him to shoot with a uniquely naturalistic and spontaneous style. While his images reflect the excitement of teenage rebelliousness (the clothing worn and music played at these events were provocative for the conservative Malian culture at the time), they also depict his stylish subjects as cosmopolitan and connecting with an international youth scene and that era’s attitude of vibrant optimism.
Los Angeles
Stephen Wilkes
Peter Fetterman Gallery
March 4, 2017 to April 29, 2017
2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
Los Angeles, California - CA90404
Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of works from Stephen Wilkes Ellis Island series along with new unseen works from his acclaimed Day to Night series. Please join us Saturday, March 4 from 3-5pm for the artist reception with Stephen Wilkes. For five years (1998-2003) New York photographer Stephen Wilkes explored the hospital complex that comprised the south side of Ellis Island. Neglected for almost fifty years, the buildings were in a state of extreme disrepair: lead paint peeled from the ceilings and walls, vines and trees grew through the floorboards, detritus and debris littered the hallways. In rooms long-abandoned, Wilkes captured a spirited new vision of this gateway to freedom. Twelve million people passed through Ellis Island. Approximately one percent were turned away for health reasons. Wilkes's powerful images of the underbelly of the island--a purgatory between freedom and captivity--ask us to reflect on the defining experiences of millions.
Los Angeles
Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media
J. Paul Getty Museum
December 20, 2016 to April 30, 2017
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, California - CA90049
Photographs have helped shape people’s perceptions of current events since the late-nineteenth century. The ubiquity of newspapers, magazines, and televised news during the mid-twentieth century gave rise to the modern mass media culture, eventually spawning critical discourse from a variety of perspectives. The philosopher Marshall McLuhan’s writings during the 1960s, including the now-famous concept that “the medium is the message,” assert that the form in which information is as significant as the content, an insight that has influenced a generation of artists and critics. Featuring photographs and video made over the last forty years, Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media, on view December 20, 2016-April 30, 2017 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center explores how artists have responded to the media’s coverage of topics ranging from local stories to international politics and military conflict.
Los Angeles
Young Blood
Fahey/Klein Gallery
February 16, 2017 to April 8, 2017
148 North La Brea
Los Angeles, California - CA90036
The color of blood is influenced by the amount of oxygen it possesses. The closer to the arteries, the brighter the red. The further it gets from those arteries, the darker the red. Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present "Young Blood" a group show featuring four young artists working within the tradition of color photography. These photographers are embracing traditional dark room techniques while pushing the boundaries of the digital color print. Each artist is using the medium to investigate the new directions of color photography with the vigor and the dedication of a scientist looking for a cure. Fahey/Klein Gallery is looking forward to the opportunity to invigorate these artists with the oxygen they need to help their color work shine brightly.
Los Angeles
Dara Friedman: Mother Drum
Kayne Griffin Corcoran
March 31, 2017 to May 13, 2017
1201 South La Brea Avenue
Los Angeles, California - CA90019
Los Angeles
Bruce Gilden: Go
Leica Gallery
April 4, 2017 to May 5, 2017
8783 Beverly Boulevard
Los Angeles, California - CA90048
Los Angeles
Labor and Photography
Los Angeles County Museum of Art - LACMA
March 18, 2017 to June 11, 2017
5905 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, California - CA90036
This selection of 14 photographs from LACMA's permanent collection is organized around questions of labor and representation: What does work look like? What does a worker look like? How do class, gender, and race influence the way we view work or the way we value workers? Representations of labor are reflected in every style of photography, from documentary photojournalism to abstract experimental photography. Individually, each grouping of photographs focuses on a different aspect of labor. Collectively, the photographs offer a rebuke to capitalism's reductive vision of work as either a daily grind for survival or a money-driven race to the top by encouraging a more nuanced approach to the many ways that concepts of labor and representations of laborers shape our lives.
Los Angeles
In Focus: Jane and Louise Wilson
J. Paul Getty Museum
February 14, 2017 to July 2, 2017
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, California - CA90049
Working collaboratively since 1989, identical twin sisters Jane and Louise Wilson create powerful, compelling photographs, videos, and installations that explore historical events and architectural spaces that resonate with power. Their Sealander series presents images of abandoned World War II bunkers along the Normandy coastline of northern France. The monumental scale and monochromatic palette of the photographs merge time and space, past and present, man-made structure and natural environment, land and sea.
Los Angeles
Generation Wealth
Annenberg Space for Photography
April 8, 2017 to August 13, 2017
2000 Avenue of the Stars
Los Angeles, California - CA90067
GENERATION WEALTH by Lauren Greenfield examines the influence of affluence over the last 25 years, illustrating the globalization of materialism, celebrity culture and social status. This timely, thought-provoking collection explores how “keeping up with the Joneses” has become Keeping Up with the Kardashians, magnifying the aspirational gap between what we want and what we can afford. The exhibit is not about the rich, but the pervasive desire for more.
Los Angeles
Eleanor Macnair
Kopeikin Gallery
October 24, 2015 to December 19, 2019
2766 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, California - CA90034
Photographs rendered in play-doh
Palm Springs
Reflections on Water
Palm Springs Art Museum
September 18, 2015 to September 4, 2017
101 Museum Drive
Palm Springs, California - CA92262
Water defines human experience. The average person is composed of approximately 60% water. It nourishes life as the body’s most necessary substance. This elementary liquid is essential for sustaining all life on the planet. As a result, the politics of water are woven into the fabric of social and economic institutions at both the regional and global level. Disputes over its distribution are at the center of struggles among interests competing for natural resources. In the desert, water is even more vital for survival than in places where it exists in abundance. Its very lack defines the desert, and yet even that ecological system could not exist without it.
Riverside
Rotation 2015 Recent Acquisitions
California Museum of Photography
March 12, 2016 to June 24, 2017
3824 Main Street
Riverside, California - CA92501
Ansel Adams, Laurie Brown, Phil Chang, Edward Sheriff Curtis, Whitney Hubbs, Barbara Kasten, Hiromu Kira, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Robert Rauschenberg, Man Ray, Christopher Russell, Henry Holmes Smith, Penelope Umbrico, Wolf von dem Bussche, Bing Wright, and others
Sacramento
Photography: Permanent Collection
Crocker Art Museum
January 1, 1880 to January 1, 2050
216 O Street
Sacramento, California - CA95814
The strength of the Crocker’s photography collection is its holdings of American photography since the mid-20th century. Examples represent major artistic movements ranging from surrealism to straight photography, street aesthetic, new topographies, and the conceptual. The collection has corollary strength in imagery of the American West, both historic and contemporary.
San Diego
Ansel Adams: What Majestic Word
Museum of Photographic Arts - MOPA
January 7, 2017 to May 16, 2017
1649 El Prado
San Diego, California - CA92112
Ansel Adams: What Majestic Word features a portfolio of prints organized in memory of Adams’ dear friend, Russell Varian. Varian was a scientist and dedicated conservationist. Each of these 15 photographs aims to capture the sensual environments that Varian adored and the natural geometry that sparked his scientific curiosity.
San Diego
Prix Pictet
MOPA
February 4, 2017 to May 23, 2017
1649 El Prado
San Diego, California - CA92112
The Prix Pictet prize highlights important social and environmental issues through the use of photography. In its sixth cycle, 12 artists examine the disorder they see in the world. The exhibition Prix Pictet: Disorder brings global attention to a range of concerns from mass production to the effects of war to natural disasters.
San Diego
Seeing is Believing?
Museum of Photographic Arts - MOPA
February 21, 2015 to December 31, 2017
1649 El Prado
San Diego, California - NY92101
Did you know that some early photographs were known as the “mirror with a memory”? Discover the answers to this question and more in MOPA’s new gallery where you’ll explore the origins of photography, and its impact on how we view the world around us and ourselves.
San Francicso
Stacey Steers
Catharine Clark Gallery
February 25, 2017 to April 15, 2017
150 Minna Street
San Francicso, California - CA94105
Edge of Alchemy is a solo exhibition of new works on paper and video by Stacey Steers.
San Francisco
Danny Lyon: Message to the future
De Young Museum
November 5, 2016 to March 30, 2017
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco, California - CA94118
Danny Lyon: Message to the Future is the first comprehensive retrospective of the career of Danny Lyon (American, b. 1942) to be presented in 25 years. The exhibition assembles approximately 175 photographs, related films, and ephemeral materials to highlight Lyon's concern with documenting social and political issues and the welfare of individuals considered by many to be on the margins of society. The presentation includes many objects that have seldom or never been exhibited before and offers a rare look at selections from Lyon's archives alongside important loans from public and private collections in the United States. This is also the first exhibition to assess the artist's achievements as a filmmaker.
San Francisco
Henri Cartier Bresson
Leica Gallery San Francisco
January 18, 2017 to March 31, 2017
463 Bush St
San Francisco, California - CA94108
The Gallery at Leica Store San Francisco, in collaboration with Peter Fetterman Gallery, is excited to announce its upcoming exhibition, Henri Cartier-Bresson from January 18, 2017 through March 31, 2017. The exhibition will feature over fifty gelatin silver hand signed prints by the iconic photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004). Born in Chanteloup, France in 1908, Cartier-Bresson grew up in a well-to do family whose textile mills supplied the thread for most french sewing kits. As a young man, he trained to become a painter under the cubist artist André Lhote and came to meet and be influenced by a number of prominent surrealists.
San Francisco
Richard Learoyd
Fraenkel Gallery
January 5, 2017 to March 4, 2017
49 Geary Street
San Francisco, California - CA94108
Fraenkel Gallery is pleased to present the worldwide debut of new, large-scale photographs by British artist Richard Learoyd from January 5 – March 4, 2017. Featured are color studio portraits, still lifes, and black-and-white landscapes photographed in California and Eastern Europe. All of the photographs were made with room-sized cameras constructed by the artist. Richard Learoyd’s singular working methods use a camera obscura to create remarkable extra-large-format darkroom photographs, up to 85 inches wide. Both in the studio and in nature, the focal point of the artist’s camera lens captures a nearly hyperreal level of detail, lending the person or landscape a heightened quality of presence. This is contrasted with the shallow depth of field, in which the subject gradually becomes out of focus as it recedes from the camera, as if to escape the visual acuity of the viewer.
San Francisco
From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art
Contemporary Jewish Museum
November 25, 2016 to April 2, 2017
736 Mission Street
San Francisco, California - CA94103
There are many forms of memory: memories of events we have experienced, memories we have heard as family stories and from popular culture, even memories of an imagined future. The twenty-four artists in From Generation to Generation: Inherited Memory and Contemporary Art work with memories that are not their own. They remember and recall stories that were never theirs and assemble them in a variety of media to be seen, heard, and experienced by others. At once intimate and shared, the memories they work with are second-hand experiences, culled from a photograph they saw, or a story they heard, or even a once subconscious memory. The artists are secondary witnesses to the past events they use in their works, and it is precisely this distance in time and space that allows them to offer powerful narratives open to a wide range of interpretation and expression.
San Francisco
Nocturnes & Noir
Harvey Milk Photo Center
February 11, 2017 to April 2, 2017
50 Scott Street
San Francisco, California - CA94117
The title of this exhibit reflects our hope to shine some light on two schools of thought re: Night Photography (NPy). The first, a romanticized landscape photography of Nocturnes traces its origins to the late 19th century, the Pictorialism movement, and later on, the efforts of the Photo-Secessionists. It is noteworthy that a number of the photographers practicing within the Pictorialism / Secessionist ethos (Steichen, Struss et al.), a decade – maybe even a few years – later, can be found showing work that falls thematically or stylistically within the purview of a new Modernist aesthetic, as promoted by the Group f/64. So, even at this early date we find a fluidity of intent, as the lines of distinction were being drawn.
San Francisco
RayKo
Rayko Photo Center
March 1, 2017 to April 23, 2017
428 Third Street
San Francisco, California - CA94108
David Wolf's The After Life of Things explores the materiality of things and the nature of photographic materials, while celebrating the wonder of the traditional darkroom in an age of its demise. As digital photography pushes the traditional darkroom toward novelty, Wolf considers the question "What makes a photograph, photographic?" from the unlikely vantage point of creating fresh work from material otherwise thought to be useless.

Wolf explores the hidden, idiosyncratic beauty of expired photographic paper to create photographs that speak to a range of human experience. He works with these papers as found, discarded objects, utilizing the typically unwanted color shifts and random marks characteristic of the aging material as a metaphor for impermanence and mortality. The photographs are both images of objects and objects themselves, engaging the viewer with subjects as varied as the idea of home, our relationship to nature, and the merging of the sacred and the profane.
San Francisco
Diane arbus: in the beginning
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art - SFMOMA
January 21, 2017 to April 30, 2017
151 Third Street
San Francisco, California - CA94103
Diane arbus: in the beginning considers the first seven years of the photographer’s career, from 1956 to 1962. A lifelong New Yorker, Arbus found the city and its citizens an endlessly rich subject for her art. Working in Times Square, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island, she made some of the most powerful portraits of the twentieth century, training her lens on the pedestrians and performers she encountered there. This exhibition highlights her early and enduring interest in the subject matter that would come to define her as an artist. It also reveals the artist’s evolution from a 35mm format to the now instantly recognizable and widely imitated look of the square format she adopted in 1962. Bringing together over 100 photographs from this formative period, many on display for the first time, diane arbus: in the beginning offers fresh insights into the distinctive vision of this iconic American photographer.
San Francisco
Larry Sultan: Here and Home
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art - SFMOMA
April 15, 2017 to July 23, 2017
151 Third Street
San Francisco, California - CA94103
This major retrospective examines the work and career of Larry Sultan (American, 1946–2009), an internationally renowned photographer with deep ties to the Bay Area as both an artist and an educator. Sultan's often intensely personal images-many drawn from his own family's history - blend documentary and staged elements in their explorations of storytelling, family, and domesticity. Larry Sultan: Here and Home explores the artist's 35-year career through more than 200 photographs, a billboard created with conceptual artist and frequent collaborator Mike Mandel, a film, and Study Hall - a room offering a unique glimpse into Sultan's exploratory process. Works on view include Sultan's early collaborative projects of the 1970s, made with Mandel, as well as his later work including Pictures from Home (1983-92), The Valley (1997-2003), and Homeland (2006–09)
San Jose
Fragile Waters
San Jose Museum of Art
March 17, 2017 to August 6, 2017
110 South Market Street
San Jose, California - CA95113
Water is very much on the minds of Californians after six years of drought. Fragile Waters celebrates this precious, essential resource and encourages dialogue about water conservation. One hundred and seventeen black-and-white photographs by three artists whose works span a century create a powerful collective statement. The exhibition will feature thirty-seven works by Adams - including rarely seen historic images from his family’s private collection- along with photographs by Ernest H. Brooks II and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly.
Stanford
In Context: Trevor Paglen
Cantor Arts Center
January 18, 2017 to May 1, 2017
Lomita Drive at Museum Way
Stanford, California - CA94305
In Context, a new exhibition series, spotlights recent museum acquisitions and explores their significance in relation to the Cantor’s existing collection. The first installation in this series positions contemporary photographer Trevor Paglen’s 2010 work Time Study (Predator; Indian Springs, NV) alongside the work of seminal 19th-century artist Eadweard Muybridge. Paglen’s haunting images engage with the grand tradition of late19th- and early 20th-century American landscape photography, raising and responding to questions about technologically mediated visual perception.
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